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Unsaturated fatty acids differ between hepatic colorectal metastases and liver tissue without tumour in humans: results from a randomised controlled trial of intravenous eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids

Unsaturated fatty acids differ between hepatic colorectal metastases and liver tissue without tumour in humans: results from a randomised controlled trial of intravenous eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids
Unsaturated fatty acids differ between hepatic colorectal metastases and liver tissue without tumour in humans: results from a randomised controlled trial of intravenous eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids
INTRODUCTION: Mediators derived from the n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) arachidonic acid oxidation have been shown to have tumour promoting effects in experimental models, while n-3 PUFAs are thought to be protective. Here we report fatty acid concentrations in hepatic colorectal metastases compared to liver tissue without tumour in humans.

METHODS: Twenty patients with colorectal liver metastasis were randomized to receive a 72h infusion of parenteral nutrition with or without n-3 PUFAs. Histological samples from liver metastases and liver tissue without tumour were obtained from 15 patients at the time of their subsequent liver resection (mean 8 days (range 4-12) post-infusion) and the fatty acid composition determined by gas chromatography.

RESULTS: There were no significant differences in fatty acid composition between the two intervention groups. When data from all patients were combined, liver tissue without tumour had a higher content of both n-3 and n-6 PUFAs and a lower content of oleic acid and total n-9 fatty acids compared with tumour tissue (p<0.0001, 0.0002,<0.0001 and <0.0001, respectively). The n-6/n-3 PUFA ratio was found to be higher in tumour tissue than tissue without tumour (p<0.0001).

CONCLUSIONS: Hepatic colorectal adenocarcinoma metastases have a higher content of n-9 fatty acids and a lower content of n-6 and n-3 PUFAs than liver tissue without tumour.
n-3 PUFA, fish oil, cancer, liver tissue composition, tumour composition
405-410
Stephenson, James A.
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Al-Taan, Omer
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Arshad, Ali
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West, Annette L.
e8dacc1a-5fdc-4a4f-92d8-608f2ea2994c
Calder, Philip C.
1797e54f-378e-4dcb-80a4-3e30018f07a6
Morgan, Bruno
0570e9d2-5b6d-4b43-be28-2b4b321d68e7
Metcalfe, Matthew S.
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Dennison, Ashely R.
ed12f4a6-88ef-490d-9463-fba9cc583294
Stephenson, James A.
16b29e75-cc40-4407-a885-21d80426607c
Al-Taan, Omer
0b963b40-5315-4a85-a005-189e5e01987f
Arshad, Ali
7f34faaa-5ff4-4307-9282-f352b37e9435
West, Annette L.
e8dacc1a-5fdc-4a4f-92d8-608f2ea2994c
Calder, Philip C.
1797e54f-378e-4dcb-80a4-3e30018f07a6
Morgan, Bruno
0570e9d2-5b6d-4b43-be28-2b4b321d68e7
Metcalfe, Matthew S.
8f11aa75-be93-41f2-945a-4d59755a6bea
Dennison, Ashely R.
ed12f4a6-88ef-490d-9463-fba9cc583294

Stephenson, James A., Al-Taan, Omer, Arshad, Ali, West, Annette L., Calder, Philip C., Morgan, Bruno, Metcalfe, Matthew S. and Dennison, Ashely R. (2013) Unsaturated fatty acids differ between hepatic colorectal metastases and liver tissue without tumour in humans: results from a randomised controlled trial of intravenous eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids. Prostaglandins, Leukotrienes and Essential Fatty Acids, 88 (6), 405-410. (doi:10.1016/j.plefa.2013.04.002). (PMID:23647811)

Record type: Article

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Mediators derived from the n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) arachidonic acid oxidation have been shown to have tumour promoting effects in experimental models, while n-3 PUFAs are thought to be protective. Here we report fatty acid concentrations in hepatic colorectal metastases compared to liver tissue without tumour in humans.

METHODS: Twenty patients with colorectal liver metastasis were randomized to receive a 72h infusion of parenteral nutrition with or without n-3 PUFAs. Histological samples from liver metastases and liver tissue without tumour were obtained from 15 patients at the time of their subsequent liver resection (mean 8 days (range 4-12) post-infusion) and the fatty acid composition determined by gas chromatography.

RESULTS: There were no significant differences in fatty acid composition between the two intervention groups. When data from all patients were combined, liver tissue without tumour had a higher content of both n-3 and n-6 PUFAs and a lower content of oleic acid and total n-9 fatty acids compared with tumour tissue (p<0.0001, 0.0002,<0.0001 and <0.0001, respectively). The n-6/n-3 PUFA ratio was found to be higher in tumour tissue than tissue without tumour (p<0.0001).

CONCLUSIONS: Hepatic colorectal adenocarcinoma metastases have a higher content of n-9 fatty acids and a lower content of n-6 and n-3 PUFAs than liver tissue without tumour.

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e-pub ahead of print date: 3 May 2013
Keywords: n-3 PUFA, fish oil, cancer, liver tissue composition, tumour composition
Organisations: Human Development & Health

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 353497
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/353497
PURE UUID: d2972b7a-29f7-44d5-8f1b-541017dfb41d
ORCID for Philip C. Calder: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6038-710X

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Date deposited: 10 Jun 2013 11:01
Last modified: 23 Jul 2022 01:39

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Contributors

Author: James A. Stephenson
Author: Omer Al-Taan
Author: Ali Arshad
Author: Annette L. West
Author: Bruno Morgan
Author: Matthew S. Metcalfe
Author: Ashely R. Dennison

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