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Anaemia and iron deficiency in children with inflammatory bowel disease

Anaemia and iron deficiency in children with inflammatory bowel disease
Anaemia and iron deficiency in children with inflammatory bowel disease
BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Anaemia and iron deficiency are common in children with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) however it is not known if the prevalence of anaemia and iron deficiency alters following diagnosis.

METHODS: Laboratory results from diagnosis, and at follow up one and two years later were recorded retrospectively in children with IBD recruited from a tertiary centre. Anaemia was defined using WHO standards and iron deficiency defined using published guidelines.

RESULTS: 46 children (16 girls) with Crohn's disease and 34 children (18 girls) with UC were studied. 75% of children with IBD were anaemic at diagnosis, 30% were anaemic at follow up two years later. 90% of children with Crohn's and 95% of children with Ulcerative Colitis (UC) were iron deficient at diagnosis. At follow up two years later 70% of children with Crohn's and 65% of children with UC were iron deficient.

CONCLUSIONS: Persistent anaemia and iron deficiency are common in childhood IBD, prevalence alters with duration of time from diagnosis.
1873-9946
687-691
Wiskin, A.E.
2f0070e1-9a80-4856-8c5f-0c91c3d06260
Fleming, B.J.
3da6ae2e-b89f-4ccb-b6a6-62504bff36ae
Wootton, S.A.
bf47ef35-0b33-4edb-a2b0-ceda5c475c0c
Beattie, R.M.
977a2f68-2bcf-4436-87e7-28a39952adda
Wiskin, A.E.
2f0070e1-9a80-4856-8c5f-0c91c3d06260
Fleming, B.J.
3da6ae2e-b89f-4ccb-b6a6-62504bff36ae
Wootton, S.A.
bf47ef35-0b33-4edb-a2b0-ceda5c475c0c
Beattie, R.M.
977a2f68-2bcf-4436-87e7-28a39952adda

Wiskin, A.E., Fleming, B.J., Wootton, S.A. and Beattie, R.M. (2012) Anaemia and iron deficiency in children with inflammatory bowel disease. Journal of Crohn's and Colitis, 6 (6), 687-691. (doi:10.1016/j.crohns.2011.12.001). (PMID:22398100)

Record type: Article

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Anaemia and iron deficiency are common in children with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) however it is not known if the prevalence of anaemia and iron deficiency alters following diagnosis.

METHODS: Laboratory results from diagnosis, and at follow up one and two years later were recorded retrospectively in children with IBD recruited from a tertiary centre. Anaemia was defined using WHO standards and iron deficiency defined using published guidelines.

RESULTS: 46 children (16 girls) with Crohn's disease and 34 children (18 girls) with UC were studied. 75% of children with IBD were anaemic at diagnosis, 30% were anaemic at follow up two years later. 90% of children with Crohn's and 95% of children with Ulcerative Colitis (UC) were iron deficient at diagnosis. At follow up two years later 70% of children with Crohn's and 65% of children with UC were iron deficient.

CONCLUSIONS: Persistent anaemia and iron deficiency are common in childhood IBD, prevalence alters with duration of time from diagnosis.

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Published date: July 2012
Organisations: Faculty of Medicine

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 353506
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/353506
ISSN: 1873-9946
PURE UUID: 790be6ec-d519-4d6a-b8a0-193ef6690edd

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Date deposited: 10 Jun 2013 11:14
Last modified: 16 Dec 2019 20:31

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Contributors

Author: A.E. Wiskin
Author: B.J. Fleming
Author: S.A. Wootton
Author: R.M. Beattie

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