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Marine current energy conversion: the dawn of a new era in electricity production

Marine current energy conversion: the dawn of a new era in electricity production
Marine current energy conversion: the dawn of a new era in electricity production
Marine currents can carry large amounts of energy, largely driven by the tides, which are a consequence of the gravitational effects of the planetary motion of the Earth, the Moon and the Sun. Augmented flow velocities can be found where the underwater topography (bathymetry) in straits between islands and the mainland or in shallows around headlands plays a major role in enhancing the flow velocities, resulting in appreciable kinetic energy. At some of these sites where practical flows are more than 1?m?s?1, marine current energy conversion is considered to be economically viable. This study describes the salient issues related to the exploitation of marine currents for electricity production, resource assessment, the conversion technologies and the status of leading projects in the field. This study also summarizes important issues related to site development and some of the approaches currently being undertaken to inform device and array development. This study concludes that, given the highlighted commitments to establish favourable regulatory and incentive regimes as well as the aspiration for energy independence and combating climate change, the progress to multi-megawatt arrays will be much faster than that achieved for wind energy development.
tidal energy, marine currents, ocean energy, renewables
1364-503X
20120500-[15pp]
Bahaj, A.S.
a64074cc-2b6e-43df-adac-a8437e7f1b37
Bahaj, A.S.
a64074cc-2b6e-43df-adac-a8437e7f1b37

Bahaj, A.S. (2013) Marine current energy conversion: the dawn of a new era in electricity production. Philosophical Transactions of The Royal Society A, 371 (1985), 20120500-[15pp]. (doi:10.1098/rsta.2012.0500).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Marine currents can carry large amounts of energy, largely driven by the tides, which are a consequence of the gravitational effects of the planetary motion of the Earth, the Moon and the Sun. Augmented flow velocities can be found where the underwater topography (bathymetry) in straits between islands and the mainland or in shallows around headlands plays a major role in enhancing the flow velocities, resulting in appreciable kinetic energy. At some of these sites where practical flows are more than 1?m?s?1, marine current energy conversion is considered to be economically viable. This study describes the salient issues related to the exploitation of marine currents for electricity production, resource assessment, the conversion technologies and the status of leading projects in the field. This study also summarizes important issues related to site development and some of the approaches currently being undertaken to inform device and array development. This study concludes that, given the highlighted commitments to establish favourable regulatory and incentive regimes as well as the aspiration for energy independence and combating climate change, the progress to multi-megawatt arrays will be much faster than that achieved for wind energy development.

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Published date: 14 January 2013
Keywords: tidal energy, marine currents, ocean energy, renewables
Organisations: Energy & Climate Change Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 353875
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/353875
ISSN: 1364-503X
PURE UUID: f1687b67-c582-462d-a9ea-448053708126
ORCID for A.S. Bahaj: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-0043-6045

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Date deposited: 24 Jun 2013 10:30
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 13:20

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Author: A.S. Bahaj ORCID iD

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