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Exploring patients' views of a cognitive behavioral therapy-based website for the self-management of irritable bowel syndrome symptoms

Exploring patients' views of a cognitive behavioral therapy-based website for the self-management of irritable bowel syndrome symptoms
Exploring patients' views of a cognitive behavioral therapy-based website for the self-management of irritable bowel syndrome symptoms
Background: Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) has been shown to have positive effects on the management of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) symptoms. A factorial pilot randomized placebo-controlled trial (called MIBS) tested the potential effectiveness of a self-management CBT-based website alongside two medications: methylcellulose and mebeverine, and a placebo. The results showed no significant differences in quality of life or symptom severity measures, but enablement and participant’s global assessment of relief was higher in the website groups.

Objective: To conduct a qualitative study nested within this trial, in order to explore patients’ views and experiences of using the CBT-based website to facilitate self-management of IBS.

Methods: Semistructured interviews were carried out with patients who had used the website with one session of nurse support (n=16) or the website alone (n=15) while participating in the MIBS trial. An inductive thematic analysis was conducted.

Results: We identified three types of engagement with the CBT-based website. One group of participants, mostly in the website-only condition, had limited or no engagement with the website. One group engaged with the content and advice on practical lifestyle changes. The final group of participants engaged with the content and advice on psychological aspects related to IBS. Similarities and differences between these three groups are explored.

Conclusions: Teaching self-management techniques through a Web intervention was received positively by most of the participants. Concepts linked to cognitive aspects of CBT appeared to be harder for participants to engage with. Participants who received nurse support rated the cognitive aspects more positively, suggesting that some therapy support alongside the website should be considered. However, the Web format was preferred by some who favored anonymity as well as those who appreciated the accessibility and ease of use of this type of management. Suggestions on how to encourage engagement with Web interventions are discussed.
1438-8871
e190-e103
Tonkin-Crine, Sarah
65679835-9bdc-48b6-92f3-cc6322cccc4f
Bishop, Felicity L.
1f5429c5-325f-4ac4-aae3-6ba85d079928
Ellis, Matthew
ee9272bb-bb5a-4c94-8483-94f62d903c43
Moss-Morris, Rona
a502f58a-d319-49a6-8aea-9dde4efc871e
Everitt, Hazel
80b9452f-9632-45a8-b017-ceeeee6971ef
Tonkin-Crine, Sarah
65679835-9bdc-48b6-92f3-cc6322cccc4f
Bishop, Felicity L.
1f5429c5-325f-4ac4-aae3-6ba85d079928
Ellis, Matthew
ee9272bb-bb5a-4c94-8483-94f62d903c43
Moss-Morris, Rona
a502f58a-d319-49a6-8aea-9dde4efc871e
Everitt, Hazel
80b9452f-9632-45a8-b017-ceeeee6971ef

Tonkin-Crine, Sarah, Bishop, Felicity L., Ellis, Matthew, Moss-Morris, Rona and Everitt, Hazel (2013) Exploring patients' views of a cognitive behavioral therapy-based website for the self-management of irritable bowel syndrome symptoms. Journal of Medical Internet Research, 15 (9), e190-e103. (doi:10.2196/jmir.2672).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) has been shown to have positive effects on the management of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) symptoms. A factorial pilot randomized placebo-controlled trial (called MIBS) tested the potential effectiveness of a self-management CBT-based website alongside two medications: methylcellulose and mebeverine, and a placebo. The results showed no significant differences in quality of life or symptom severity measures, but enablement and participant’s global assessment of relief was higher in the website groups.

Objective: To conduct a qualitative study nested within this trial, in order to explore patients’ views and experiences of using the CBT-based website to facilitate self-management of IBS.

Methods: Semistructured interviews were carried out with patients who had used the website with one session of nurse support (n=16) or the website alone (n=15) while participating in the MIBS trial. An inductive thematic analysis was conducted.

Results: We identified three types of engagement with the CBT-based website. One group of participants, mostly in the website-only condition, had limited or no engagement with the website. One group engaged with the content and advice on practical lifestyle changes. The final group of participants engaged with the content and advice on psychological aspects related to IBS. Similarities and differences between these three groups are explored.

Conclusions: Teaching self-management techniques through a Web intervention was received positively by most of the participants. Concepts linked to cognitive aspects of CBT appeared to be harder for participants to engage with. Participants who received nurse support rated the cognitive aspects more positively, suggesting that some therapy support alongside the website should be considered. However, the Web format was preferred by some who favored anonymity as well as those who appreciated the accessibility and ease of use of this type of management. Suggestions on how to encourage engagement with Web interventions are discussed.

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More information

Published date: 2013
Organisations: Primary Care & Population Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 353895
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/353895
ISSN: 1438-8871
PURE UUID: b55bc651-ffdc-4904-939f-954f65279113
ORCID for Felicity L. Bishop: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8737-6662
ORCID for Hazel Everitt: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-7362-8403

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 24 Jun 2013 10:23
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 12:53

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