The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Which type of hospital discharge report reaches general practitioners most quickly?

Which type of hospital discharge report reaches general practitioners most quickly?
Which type of hospital discharge report reaches general practitioners most quickly?
Patients recently discharged from hospital often have to be followed up by their general practitioners in the absence of any information from the hospital because of delays of several days before a discharge note reaches the practice. Some hospitals have combined the form for prescribing treatment for patients to take home with them with the discharge note. Thus a note is automatically written to the general practitioner for any patient who is given drugs to take home before that patient can be discharged. The note should be posted before, or at the time of, discharge. This combined discharge note and prescription form should reach the general practitioner more quickly on average than a separate discharge note, which is usually written when the junior hospital doctor can find time, not necessarily at the time of the patient's discharge. We carried out a study to assess this.
0959-8138
362-363
Kendrick, A.R.
c697a72c-c698-469d-8ac2-f00df40583e5
Hindmarsh, D.J.
26516869-1411-4451-bb51-c8681fb8110d
Kendrick, A.R.
c697a72c-c698-469d-8ac2-f00df40583e5
Hindmarsh, D.J.
26516869-1411-4451-bb51-c8681fb8110d

Kendrick, A.R. and Hindmarsh, D.J. (1989) Which type of hospital discharge report reaches general practitioners most quickly? British Medical Journal, 298 (6670), 362-363. (doi:10.1136/bmj.298.6670.362-a).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Patients recently discharged from hospital often have to be followed up by their general practitioners in the absence of any information from the hospital because of delays of several days before a discharge note reaches the practice. Some hospitals have combined the form for prescribing treatment for patients to take home with them with the discharge note. Thus a note is automatically written to the general practitioner for any patient who is given drugs to take home before that patient can be discharged. The note should be posted before, or at the time of, discharge. This combined discharge note and prescription form should reach the general practitioner more quickly on average than a separate discharge note, which is usually written when the junior hospital doctor can find time, not necessarily at the time of the patient's discharge. We carried out a study to assess this.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 1989
Organisations: Primary Care & Population Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 353940
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/353940
ISSN: 0959-8138
PURE UUID: 1c93235c-9e8e-4a26-b96c-d3fb16387f43
ORCID for A.R. Kendrick: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1618-9381

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 25 Jun 2013 12:29
Last modified: 17 Mar 2021 02:36

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×