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Readiness to change health behaviours among patients at high risk of cardiovascular disease

Readiness to change health behaviours among patients at high risk of cardiovascular disease
Readiness to change health behaviours among patients at high risk of cardiovascular disease
Objective: To determine readiness to change dietary intake of fat, physical exercise and smoking, using a classification based on the stages of change model, among patients in a primary care population selected to have greater than normal risk of coronary heart disease.

Methods: We recruited 883 patients from general practices in the south of England who had one or more of the following cardiovascular risk factors: Current cigarette smoking, total cholesterol level 6.5-9.0 mmol/l and a body mass index of 25-35 kg/m2 coupled with a lack of regular physical exercise. Measures of cardiovascular risk factors were obtained, together with questionnaire measures of stage of readiness to change smoking behaviour, dietary intake of fat and level of physical exercise.

Results: Patients with high cholesterol levels had a different degree of readiness to reduce dietary fat from that of those with low cholesterol levels. Patients who were overweight and inactive reported a greater readiness to increase their physical activity than did those who were not overweight and not inactive. Readiness to change any of the three behaviours was not affected by the presence of more than one modifiable risk factor. However, patients who were contemplating or preparing to stop smoking were also more ready to increase physical activity than were those who were not considering stopping smoking.

Conclusions: Risk classification has an impact upon patients' readiness to change modifiable cardiovascular risk behaviours. The relationships between readiness to change various behaviours suggest that there are synergies in counselling strategies and methods of identifying patients who might be especially responsive.
coronary heart disease prevention, stage of change, smoking, nutrition, physical activity
1350-6277
147-153
Doherty, Sheelagh C.
c12ce4f8-cb12-4097-8f78-ae2b6d0fff44
Steptoe, Andrew
aadc4799-ddd7-4013-a8c9-c37ec87f23c3
Rink, Elizabeth
09028936-7054-40eb-a368-cc0c0843298b
Kendrick, Tony
c697a72c-c698-469d-8ac2-f00df40583e5
Hilton, Sean
b21c9ef8-8efa-4fdc-96df-132948d2401a
Doherty, Sheelagh C.
c12ce4f8-cb12-4097-8f78-ae2b6d0fff44
Steptoe, Andrew
aadc4799-ddd7-4013-a8c9-c37ec87f23c3
Rink, Elizabeth
09028936-7054-40eb-a368-cc0c0843298b
Kendrick, Tony
c697a72c-c698-469d-8ac2-f00df40583e5
Hilton, Sean
b21c9ef8-8efa-4fdc-96df-132948d2401a

Doherty, Sheelagh C., Steptoe, Andrew, Rink, Elizabeth, Kendrick, Tony and Hilton, Sean (1998) Readiness to change health behaviours among patients at high risk of cardiovascular disease. Journal of Cardiovascular Risk, 5 (3), 147-153. (doi:10.1177/174182679800500302). (PMID:10201550)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Objective: To determine readiness to change dietary intake of fat, physical exercise and smoking, using a classification based on the stages of change model, among patients in a primary care population selected to have greater than normal risk of coronary heart disease.

Methods: We recruited 883 patients from general practices in the south of England who had one or more of the following cardiovascular risk factors: Current cigarette smoking, total cholesterol level 6.5-9.0 mmol/l and a body mass index of 25-35 kg/m2 coupled with a lack of regular physical exercise. Measures of cardiovascular risk factors were obtained, together with questionnaire measures of stage of readiness to change smoking behaviour, dietary intake of fat and level of physical exercise.

Results: Patients with high cholesterol levels had a different degree of readiness to reduce dietary fat from that of those with low cholesterol levels. Patients who were overweight and inactive reported a greater readiness to increase their physical activity than did those who were not overweight and not inactive. Readiness to change any of the three behaviours was not affected by the presence of more than one modifiable risk factor. However, patients who were contemplating or preparing to stop smoking were also more ready to increase physical activity than were those who were not considering stopping smoking.

Conclusions: Risk classification has an impact upon patients' readiness to change modifiable cardiovascular risk behaviours. The relationships between readiness to change various behaviours suggest that there are synergies in counselling strategies and methods of identifying patients who might be especially responsive.

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More information

Published date: June 1998
Keywords: coronary heart disease prevention, stage of change, smoking, nutrition, physical activity
Organisations: Primary Care & Population Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 353975
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/353975
ISSN: 1350-6277
PURE UUID: 2244f7fa-1680-42ba-b5eb-d3f05662363f
ORCID for Tony Kendrick: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1618-9381

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Date deposited: 26 Jun 2013 10:20
Last modified: 10 Dec 2019 01:51

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Contributors

Author: Sheelagh C. Doherty
Author: Andrew Steptoe
Author: Elizabeth Rink
Author: Tony Kendrick ORCID iD
Author: Sean Hilton

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