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Imaging of plasmonic nanoparticles for biomedical applications

Imaging of plasmonic nanoparticles for biomedical applications
Imaging of plasmonic nanoparticles for biomedical applications
Plasmonic nanoparticles show potential for numerous different biomedical applications, including diagnostic applications such as targeted labelling and therapeutic applications such as drug delivery and therapeutic hyperthermia. In order to support the development of these applications, imaging techniques are required for imaging and characterising nanoparticles both in isolation and in the cellular environment.

The work presented in this thesis relates to the use and development of two different optical techniques for imaging and measuring the localised surface plasmon resonance
of plasmonic nanoparticles, both for isolated particles and for particles in a cellular environment.

The two techniques that have been used in this project are hyperspectral darkfield microscopy and spatial modulation microscopy.

Hyperspectral darkfield microscopy is a darkfield technique in which a supercontinuum light source and an acousto-optic tuneable filter are used to collect darkfield images which
include spectral information. This technique has been used to measure the spectra of single nanoparticles of different shapes and sizes, and nanoparticle clusters. The results
of some of these measurements have also been correlated with finite element method simulations and transmission electron microscope images.

The hyperspectral darkfield technique has also been used to image cells that have been incubated with nanoparticles, demonstrating that this technique may also be used to
measure the spectra of nanoparticle clusters on a cellular background.

Spatial modulation microscopy is based on fast modulation of the position of a nanoparticle in the focus of an optical beam. This modulation results in a variation in transmitted
intensity, which can be detected with very high sensitivity using a lock-in amplifier. Since, for biological imaging applications it is desirable to be able to image, for example whole cells in real time, a fast scanning version of this technique has been implemented, which increases the applicability of the technique to imaging of nanoparticles in cells
Fairbairn, Natasha
0dda470b-3803-48be-a254-08b8aee1be38
Fairbairn, Natasha
0dda470b-3803-48be-a254-08b8aee1be38
Muskens, Otto
2284101a-f9ef-4d79-8951-a6cda5bfc7f9

(2013) Imaging of plasmonic nanoparticles for biomedical applications. University of Southampton, Faculty of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Doctoral Thesis, 101pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

Plasmonic nanoparticles show potential for numerous different biomedical applications, including diagnostic applications such as targeted labelling and therapeutic applications such as drug delivery and therapeutic hyperthermia. In order to support the development of these applications, imaging techniques are required for imaging and characterising nanoparticles both in isolation and in the cellular environment.

The work presented in this thesis relates to the use and development of two different optical techniques for imaging and measuring the localised surface plasmon resonance
of plasmonic nanoparticles, both for isolated particles and for particles in a cellular environment.

The two techniques that have been used in this project are hyperspectral darkfield microscopy and spatial modulation microscopy.

Hyperspectral darkfield microscopy is a darkfield technique in which a supercontinuum light source and an acousto-optic tuneable filter are used to collect darkfield images which
include spectral information. This technique has been used to measure the spectra of single nanoparticles of different shapes and sizes, and nanoparticle clusters. The results
of some of these measurements have also been correlated with finite element method simulations and transmission electron microscope images.

The hyperspectral darkfield technique has also been used to image cells that have been incubated with nanoparticles, demonstrating that this technique may also be used to
measure the spectra of nanoparticle clusters on a cellular background.

Spatial modulation microscopy is based on fast modulation of the position of a nanoparticle in the focus of an optical beam. This modulation results in a variation in transmitted
intensity, which can be detected with very high sensitivity using a lock-in amplifier. Since, for biological imaging applications it is desirable to be able to image, for example whole cells in real time, a fast scanning version of this technique has been implemented, which increases the applicability of the technique to imaging of nanoparticles in cells

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More information

Published date: May 2013
Organisations: University of Southampton, Theoretical Partical Physics Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 353976
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/353976
PURE UUID: 517410bb-63d0-4266-9987-d504f86df520
ORCID for Otto Muskens: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0693-5504

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Date deposited: 01 Jul 2013 10:18
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 12:35

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