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A community of practice: a case study exploring safety and quality through professional leadership

A community of practice: a case study exploring safety and quality through professional leadership
A community of practice: a case study exploring safety and quality through professional leadership
This research reports an emerging Community of Practice (CoP), informing how knowledge, understanding and learning were shared through professional leaders using stories to influence change and improve the safety and quality of services. The research focused on generating knowledge and dramatising leadership experiences in integrated community health and social care services. A case study design and multiple qualitative data collection methods were used. The analysis of all data sources revealed rich descriptions with several emerging features including: a) Constructing and sharing a meaning for professional leadership through partnership working to foster cross organisational learning. b) Creating an entrepreneurial identity through contextualising new knowledge and skills c) Developing skills and confidence to be instrumental in progressing the safety and quality agenda d) Using storytelling, sharing anecdotes to dramatise experiences and encourage debate creating shared meanings within the Community of Practice e) The Community of Practice created a forum for learning through generating professional capital by sharing experiential knowledge. The theory practice gap has been closed through professional practice and leadership discourse, developing new knowledge to lead and empower practitioners. In doing so it has widened the debate regarding the professional leadership structure in operation and questioned the need to reshape the context in which professional leaders act and are able to influence the safety and quality of services. Professional leaders should have continual investment as a resource to impact on safety and quality improvements, service developments and managing change. Communities of Practice should be acknowledged and established as an opportunity to generate collective knowledge and influence organisational development and change. Storytelling and narrative can be used as a recognised methodology for sharing specific experiences in order to reflect, contextualise and provide the language required to influence the wider organisational strategic direction. A recognised programme of further research should be considered.
Lewis-Smith, Alison
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Lewis-Smith, Alison
0da10d82-8d36-44a7-a197-6aec229f4f4b
Le May, Andree
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Lewis-Smith, Alison (2013) A community of practice: a case study exploring safety and quality through professional leadership. University of Southampton, Faculty of Health Sciences, Doctoral Thesis, 217pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

This research reports an emerging Community of Practice (CoP), informing how knowledge, understanding and learning were shared through professional leaders using stories to influence change and improve the safety and quality of services. The research focused on generating knowledge and dramatising leadership experiences in integrated community health and social care services. A case study design and multiple qualitative data collection methods were used. The analysis of all data sources revealed rich descriptions with several emerging features including: a) Constructing and sharing a meaning for professional leadership through partnership working to foster cross organisational learning. b) Creating an entrepreneurial identity through contextualising new knowledge and skills c) Developing skills and confidence to be instrumental in progressing the safety and quality agenda d) Using storytelling, sharing anecdotes to dramatise experiences and encourage debate creating shared meanings within the Community of Practice e) The Community of Practice created a forum for learning through generating professional capital by sharing experiential knowledge. The theory practice gap has been closed through professional practice and leadership discourse, developing new knowledge to lead and empower practitioners. In doing so it has widened the debate regarding the professional leadership structure in operation and questioned the need to reshape the context in which professional leaders act and are able to influence the safety and quality of services. Professional leaders should have continual investment as a resource to impact on safety and quality improvements, service developments and managing change. Communities of Practice should be acknowledged and established as an opportunity to generate collective knowledge and influence organisational development and change. Storytelling and narrative can be used as a recognised methodology for sharing specific experiences in order to reflect, contextualise and provide the language required to influence the wider organisational strategic direction. A recognised programme of further research should be considered.

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More information

Published date: June 2013
Organisations: University of Southampton, Faculty of Health Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 354123
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/354123
PURE UUID: 3f47f9e1-f806-4b24-b7d0-896ceccffc59

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Date deposited: 08 Jul 2013 12:17
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 03:58

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Contributors

Author: Alison Lewis-Smith
Thesis advisor: Andree Le May

University divisions

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