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Diet patterns are associated with demographic factors and nutritional status in south Indian children

Diet patterns are associated with demographic factors and nutritional status in south Indian children
Diet patterns are associated with demographic factors and nutritional status in south Indian children
The burden of non-communicable chronic disease (NCD) in India is increasing. Diet and body composition ‘track’ from childhood into adult life and contribute to the development of risk factors for NCD. Little is known about the diet patterns of Indian children. We aimed to identify diet patterns and study associations with body composition and socio-demographic factors in the Mysore Parthenon Study cohort. We collected anthropometric and demographic data from children aged 9.5 years (n = 538). We also administered a food frequency questionnaire and measured fasting blood concentrations of folate and vitamin B12. Using principal component analysis, we identified two diet patterns. The ‘snack and fruit’ pattern was characterised by frequent intakes of snacks, fruit, sweetened drinks, rice and meat dishes and leavened breads. The ‘lacto-vegetarian’ pattern was characterised by frequent intakes of finger millet, vegetarian rice dishes, yoghurt, vegetable dishes and infrequent meat consumption. Adherence to the ‘snack and fruit’ pattern was associated with season, being Muslim and urban dwelling. Adherence to the lacto-vegetarian pattern was associated with being Hindu, rural dwelling and a lower maternal body mass index. The ‘snack and fruit’ pattern was negatively associated with the child's adiposity. The lacto-vegetarian pattern was positively associated with blood folate concentration and negatively with vitamin B12 concentration. This study provides new information on correlates of diet patterns in Indian children and how diet relates to nutritional status. Follow-up of these children will be important to determine the role of these differences in diet in the development of risk factors for NCD including body composition.
1740-8695
Kehoe, Sarah
534e5729-632b-4b4f-8401-164d8c20aa26
Ghattu, Krishnaveni
29afac69-32bc-45d3-bedf-c16cc4e36aa0
Sargoor, Veena
84de6582-8ac1-4833-b493-5ae42980975a
Guntupalli, Aravinda Meera
6ab00497-f86b-4bec-b393-c35a0c1054c9
Margetts, Barrie
d415f4a1-d572-4ebc-be25-f54886cb4788
Fall, Caroline H.D.
7171a105-34f5-4131-89d7-1aa639893b18
Robinson, Sian
ba591c98-4380-456a-be8a-c452f992b69b
Kehoe, Sarah
534e5729-632b-4b4f-8401-164d8c20aa26
Ghattu, Krishnaveni
29afac69-32bc-45d3-bedf-c16cc4e36aa0
Sargoor, Veena
84de6582-8ac1-4833-b493-5ae42980975a
Guntupalli, Aravinda Meera
6ab00497-f86b-4bec-b393-c35a0c1054c9
Margetts, Barrie
d415f4a1-d572-4ebc-be25-f54886cb4788
Fall, Caroline H.D.
7171a105-34f5-4131-89d7-1aa639893b18
Robinson, Sian
ba591c98-4380-456a-be8a-c452f992b69b

Kehoe, Sarah, Ghattu, Krishnaveni, Sargoor, Veena, Guntupalli, Aravinda Meera, Margetts, Barrie, Fall, Caroline H.D. and Robinson, Sian (2013) Diet patterns are associated with demographic factors and nutritional status in south Indian children. Maternal & Child Nutrition. (doi:10.1111/mcn.12046).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The burden of non-communicable chronic disease (NCD) in India is increasing. Diet and body composition ‘track’ from childhood into adult life and contribute to the development of risk factors for NCD. Little is known about the diet patterns of Indian children. We aimed to identify diet patterns and study associations with body composition and socio-demographic factors in the Mysore Parthenon Study cohort. We collected anthropometric and demographic data from children aged 9.5 years (n = 538). We also administered a food frequency questionnaire and measured fasting blood concentrations of folate and vitamin B12. Using principal component analysis, we identified two diet patterns. The ‘snack and fruit’ pattern was characterised by frequent intakes of snacks, fruit, sweetened drinks, rice and meat dishes and leavened breads. The ‘lacto-vegetarian’ pattern was characterised by frequent intakes of finger millet, vegetarian rice dishes, yoghurt, vegetable dishes and infrequent meat consumption. Adherence to the ‘snack and fruit’ pattern was associated with season, being Muslim and urban dwelling. Adherence to the lacto-vegetarian pattern was associated with being Hindu, rural dwelling and a lower maternal body mass index. The ‘snack and fruit’ pattern was negatively associated with the child's adiposity. The lacto-vegetarian pattern was positively associated with blood folate concentration and negatively with vitamin B12 concentration. This study provides new information on correlates of diet patterns in Indian children and how diet relates to nutritional status. Follow-up of these children will be important to determine the role of these differences in diet in the development of risk factors for NCD including body composition.

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e-pub ahead of print date: 2 July 2013
Organisations: Faculty of Medicine, Social Sciences, Faculty of Humanities

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Local EPrints ID: 354214
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/354214
ISSN: 1740-8695
PURE UUID: 2b4df766-99c6-48a6-9a01-2bcb7ef4592b
ORCID for Sarah Kehoe: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-2584-7999
ORCID for Caroline H.D. Fall: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4402-5552
ORCID for Sian Robinson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1766-7269

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Date deposited: 04 Jul 2013 09:09
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 16:54

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Contributors

Author: Sarah Kehoe ORCID iD
Author: Krishnaveni Ghattu
Author: Veena Sargoor
Author: Aravinda Meera Guntupalli
Author: Barrie Margetts
Author: Sian Robinson ORCID iD

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