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A new approach to ultrasonic cleaning

A new approach to ultrasonic cleaning
A new approach to ultrasonic cleaning
Traditional ultrasonic cleaning baths are limited in that they cannot clean objects that are too large to fit in the bath, and cannot be taken to objects with complex geometries in order to ?clean in place?. Furthermore the object to be cleaned sits in a ?soup? of contaminated liquid, and whilst cavitation fields can be set up under test conditions, immersion of the object to be cleaned can significantly degrade the bath?s performance by disrupting the sound field. An alternative technique, which does not use ultrasound is the commercial pressure- or powerwasher, where high speed jets of water and cleaning agent are pumped onto a surface. Although these can ?clean in place?, they pump large volumes of water, and produce significant volumes of contaminated run-off and contaminated aerosol, both of which are hazards for secondary contamination of users and water supplies. The momentum of the water and pump requirements mean they are difficult to scale up. This paper specifies a low volume flow technique for ultrasonic cleaning in place, benefits being that it operates with low flow rates (1-2 litres per minute), and there is no need to expend energy on heating the water.
075029-075029
Leighton, Timothy G.
3e5262ce-1d7d-42eb-b013-fcc5c286bbae
Birkin, Peter
ba466560-f27c-418d-89fc-67ea4f81d0a7
Offin, Doug
ae965608-d6ff-4d2a-bc94-78d706e6d65d
Leighton, Timothy G.
3e5262ce-1d7d-42eb-b013-fcc5c286bbae
Birkin, Peter
ba466560-f27c-418d-89fc-67ea4f81d0a7
Offin, Doug
ae965608-d6ff-4d2a-bc94-78d706e6d65d

Leighton, Timothy G., Birkin, Peter and Offin, Doug (2013) A new approach to ultrasonic cleaning. International Congress on Acoustics, Canada. 075029-075029 . (doi:10.1121/1.4799209).

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Traditional ultrasonic cleaning baths are limited in that they cannot clean objects that are too large to fit in the bath, and cannot be taken to objects with complex geometries in order to ?clean in place?. Furthermore the object to be cleaned sits in a ?soup? of contaminated liquid, and whilst cavitation fields can be set up under test conditions, immersion of the object to be cleaned can significantly degrade the bath?s performance by disrupting the sound field. An alternative technique, which does not use ultrasound is the commercial pressure- or powerwasher, where high speed jets of water and cleaning agent are pumped onto a surface. Although these can ?clean in place?, they pump large volumes of water, and produce significant volumes of contaminated run-off and contaminated aerosol, both of which are hazards for secondary contamination of users and water supplies. The momentum of the water and pump requirements mean they are difficult to scale up. This paper specifies a low volume flow technique for ultrasonic cleaning in place, benefits being that it operates with low flow rates (1-2 litres per minute), and there is no need to expend energy on heating the water.

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More information

Published date: 2013
Venue - Dates: International Congress on Acoustics, Canada, 2013-01-01
Organisations: Chemistry, Signal Processing & Control Grp

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 354258
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/354258
PURE UUID: 203ebfa3-c663-4891-b80f-fae4ba787bef
ORCID for Timothy G. Leighton: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1649-8750
ORCID for Peter Birkin: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6656-4074

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 05 Jul 2013 10:54
Last modified: 05 Nov 2019 02:04

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Contributors

Author: Peter Birkin ORCID iD
Author: Doug Offin

University divisions

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