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The genomics of plant response to elevated atmospheric CO2 –elucidating plastic and adaptive mechanisms

The genomics of plant response to elevated atmospheric CO2 –elucidating plastic and adaptive mechanisms
The genomics of plant response to elevated atmospheric CO2 –elucidating plastic and adaptive mechanisms
The increase of carbon dioxide concentration ([CO2]) is the main factor in global climate change, and the atmospheric [CO2] has risen from 280 parts per million (ppm) during the pre-industrial period to the most recently estimated figure of 400 ?mol mol-1 due to human activities. The increase of [CO2] could potentially have a morphological, genetic and ecological effect on vegetation. Populus is considered as a model tree to study the autumnal senescence in response to different [CO2] for several reasons. Previous studies have identified elevated [CO2] (e[CO2]) could cause delayed natural autumnal senescence on plants such as poplar and soybean. This report studied two microarrays on two Populus species– Populus. x euramericana and Populus tremuloides grown under ambient and elevated [CO2] (360ppm and 550 560ppm) from POP/EUROFACE and AspenFACE and identified that e[CO2] significantly increased the antioxidative enzyme and products (anthocyanin), thus prevented oxidative stress and therefore caused delayed natural senescence. Further study of e[CO2] effect on an evolutionary level was applied on Plantago lanceolata, a common grass species which has grown in a naturally high-CO2 spring for hundreds of years. The plants from inside and outside of the spring were collected and exposed to either ambient or elevated [CO2] (380ppm and 700ppm) for a seasonal cycle. The morphological study indicated that plant biomass traits were influenced by long term [CO2] (original site), whereas epidermal cells and stomatal traits showed more adaptation to short-term [CO2] change (elevated/ambient [CO2]). The following transcriptome sequencing on the plants from inside and outside spring supported the morphological data and identified an in-sufficient Calvin cycle in spring plants’ response to high [CO2]. However, the significant genetic evolutionary adaption to high [CO2] failed to be detected in this experiment. Furthermore research on the genetic and genomic level was required to understand whether long-term growth in different [CO2] has a selection effect on plants. This will allow the prediction of vegetation behaviour in future atmospheric [CO2].
Lin, Yunan
71c147ff-0020-4648-acef-3f01d2c3242c
Lin, Yunan
71c147ff-0020-4648-acef-3f01d2c3242c
Taylor, Gail
f3851db9-d37c-4c36-8663-e5c2cb03e171

(2012) The genomics of plant response to elevated atmospheric CO2 –elucidating plastic and adaptive mechanisms. University of Southampton, Biological Sciences, Doctoral Thesis, 251pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

The increase of carbon dioxide concentration ([CO2]) is the main factor in global climate change, and the atmospheric [CO2] has risen from 280 parts per million (ppm) during the pre-industrial period to the most recently estimated figure of 400 ?mol mol-1 due to human activities. The increase of [CO2] could potentially have a morphological, genetic and ecological effect on vegetation. Populus is considered as a model tree to study the autumnal senescence in response to different [CO2] for several reasons. Previous studies have identified elevated [CO2] (e[CO2]) could cause delayed natural autumnal senescence on plants such as poplar and soybean. This report studied two microarrays on two Populus species– Populus. x euramericana and Populus tremuloides grown under ambient and elevated [CO2] (360ppm and 550 560ppm) from POP/EUROFACE and AspenFACE and identified that e[CO2] significantly increased the antioxidative enzyme and products (anthocyanin), thus prevented oxidative stress and therefore caused delayed natural senescence. Further study of e[CO2] effect on an evolutionary level was applied on Plantago lanceolata, a common grass species which has grown in a naturally high-CO2 spring for hundreds of years. The plants from inside and outside of the spring were collected and exposed to either ambient or elevated [CO2] (380ppm and 700ppm) for a seasonal cycle. The morphological study indicated that plant biomass traits were influenced by long term [CO2] (original site), whereas epidermal cells and stomatal traits showed more adaptation to short-term [CO2] change (elevated/ambient [CO2]). The following transcriptome sequencing on the plants from inside and outside spring supported the morphological data and identified an in-sufficient Calvin cycle in spring plants’ response to high [CO2]. However, the significant genetic evolutionary adaption to high [CO2] failed to be detected in this experiment. Furthermore research on the genetic and genomic level was required to understand whether long-term growth in different [CO2] has a selection effect on plants. This will allow the prediction of vegetation behaviour in future atmospheric [CO2].

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Published date: 30 November 2012
Organisations: University of Southampton, Environmental

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Local EPrints ID: 354433
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/354433
PURE UUID: c62df32c-4d68-4c33-a275-b6206cb1c618
ORCID for Gail Taylor: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-8470-6390

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Date deposited: 22 Oct 2013 10:36
Last modified: 25 May 2019 00:36

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Contributors

Author: Yunan Lin
Thesis advisor: Gail Taylor ORCID iD

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