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A power flow method for evaluating vibration from underground railways

A power flow method for evaluating vibration from underground railways
A power flow method for evaluating vibration from underground railways
One of the major sources of ground-borne vibration is the running of trains in underground railway tunnels. Vibration is generated at the wheel–rail interface, from where it propagates through the tunnel and surrounding soil into nearby buildings. An understanding of the dynamic interfaces between track, tunnel and soil is essential before engineering solutions to the vibration problem can be found. A new method has been developed to evaluate the effectiveness of vibration countermeasures. The method is based on calculating the mean power flow from the tunnel, paying attention to that part of the power which radiates upwards to places where buildings’ foundations are expected to be found. The mean power is calculated for an infinite train moving through the tunnel with a constant velocity. An elegant mathematical expression for the mean power flow is derived, which can be used with any underground-tunnel model. To evaluate the effect of vibration countermeasures and track properties on power flow, a comprehensive three-dimensional analytical model is used. It consists of Euler–Bernoulli beams to account for the rails and the track slab. These are coupled in the wavenumber–frequency domain to a thin shell representing the tunnel embedded within an infinite continuum, with a cylindrical cavity representing the surrounding soil.
0022-460X
667-679
Hussein, M.F.M.
3535c131-1710-4edc-a4a1-8fe67dee3f67
Hunt, H.E.M.
00743f03-05d5-4a74-bd25-96cd0679f808
Hussein, M.F.M.
3535c131-1710-4edc-a4a1-8fe67dee3f67
Hunt, H.E.M.
00743f03-05d5-4a74-bd25-96cd0679f808

Hussein, M.F.M. and Hunt, H.E.M. (2006) A power flow method for evaluating vibration from underground railways. [in special issue: Proceedings of the Eighth International Workshop on Railway Noise] Journal of Sound and Vibration, 293 (3-5), 667-679. (doi:10.1016/j.jsv.2005.12.012).

Record type: Article

Abstract

One of the major sources of ground-borne vibration is the running of trains in underground railway tunnels. Vibration is generated at the wheel–rail interface, from where it propagates through the tunnel and surrounding soil into nearby buildings. An understanding of the dynamic interfaces between track, tunnel and soil is essential before engineering solutions to the vibration problem can be found. A new method has been developed to evaluate the effectiveness of vibration countermeasures. The method is based on calculating the mean power flow from the tunnel, paying attention to that part of the power which radiates upwards to places where buildings’ foundations are expected to be found. The mean power is calculated for an infinite train moving through the tunnel with a constant velocity. An elegant mathematical expression for the mean power flow is derived, which can be used with any underground-tunnel model. To evaluate the effect of vibration countermeasures and track properties on power flow, a comprehensive three-dimensional analytical model is used. It consists of Euler–Bernoulli beams to account for the rails and the track slab. These are coupled in the wavenumber–frequency domain to a thin shell representing the tunnel embedded within an infinite continuum, with a cylindrical cavity representing the surrounding soil.

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More information

Published date: 13 June 2006
Organisations: Dynamics Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 354495
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/354495
ISSN: 0022-460X
PURE UUID: 54e9a0bf-4d70-426f-a634-e9f59b1d5d31

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Date deposited: 22 Oct 2013 10:45
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 03:55

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