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Controlling the wettability of hierarchically structured thermoplastics

Controlling the wettability of hierarchically structured thermoplastics
Controlling the wettability of hierarchically structured thermoplastics
Surfaces play an important role in defining the properties of materials, controlling wetting, adsorption, or desorption of biomolecules, and sealing/bonding of different materials. We have combined microscale features with plasma-etched nanoscale roughness and chemical modification to tailor the wettability of the substrates. Cyclic olefin polymers and copolymers (COPs/COCs) were processed to make a range of surfaces with controlled superhydrophobic or -hydrophilic properties. The hydrophobic properties of the polymers were increased by the introduction of microstructures of varying geometry and spacing through hot embossing. The COC/COP substrates were functionalized by plasma activation in O2, CF4, and a mixture of both gases. The plasma etching introduces nanoscale roughness and also chemically modifies the surface, creating either highly hydrophilic or highly hydrophobic (contact angle >150°) surfaces depending on the gas mixture. The influence of geometry and chemistries was characterized by atomic force microscopy, contact angle measurements, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Measurements of the contact angle and contact angle hysteresis demonstrated long-term stability of the superhydrophobic/superhydrophilic characteristics (>6 months).
0743-7463
896-904
Cortese, Barbara
db7b299c-bab1-4139-950b-3251c86abf7f
Morgan, Hywel
de00d59f-a5a2-48c4-a99a-1d5dd7854174
Cortese, Barbara
db7b299c-bab1-4139-950b-3251c86abf7f
Morgan, Hywel
de00d59f-a5a2-48c4-a99a-1d5dd7854174

Cortese, Barbara and Morgan, Hywel (2011) Controlling the wettability of hierarchically structured thermoplastics. Langmuir, 28 (1), 896-904. (doi:10.1021/la203741b).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Surfaces play an important role in defining the properties of materials, controlling wetting, adsorption, or desorption of biomolecules, and sealing/bonding of different materials. We have combined microscale features with plasma-etched nanoscale roughness and chemical modification to tailor the wettability of the substrates. Cyclic olefin polymers and copolymers (COPs/COCs) were processed to make a range of surfaces with controlled superhydrophobic or -hydrophilic properties. The hydrophobic properties of the polymers were increased by the introduction of microstructures of varying geometry and spacing through hot embossing. The COC/COP substrates were functionalized by plasma activation in O2, CF4, and a mixture of both gases. The plasma etching introduces nanoscale roughness and also chemically modifies the surface, creating either highly hydrophilic or highly hydrophobic (contact angle >150°) surfaces depending on the gas mixture. The influence of geometry and chemistries was characterized by atomic force microscopy, contact angle measurements, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Measurements of the contact angle and contact angle hysteresis demonstrated long-term stability of the superhydrophobic/superhydrophilic characteristics (>6 months).

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More information

Published date: 1 November 2011
Organisations: Electronics & Computer Science

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 354603
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/354603
ISSN: 0743-7463
PURE UUID: cdf15680-c90e-4df8-8466-85f23864411c
ORCID for Hywel Morgan: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4850-5676

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Date deposited: 16 Jul 2013 10:21
Last modified: 10 Sep 2019 00:45

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Contributors

Author: Barbara Cortese
Author: Hywel Morgan ORCID iD

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