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The effects of Snoezelen (multi-sensory behavior therapy) and psychiatric care on agitation, apathy, and activities of daily living in dementia patients on a short term geriatric psychiatric inpatient it

The effects of Snoezelen (multi-sensory behavior therapy) and psychiatric care on agitation, apathy, and activities of daily living in dementia patients on a short term geriatric psychiatric inpatient it
The effects of Snoezelen (multi-sensory behavior therapy) and psychiatric care on agitation, apathy, and activities of daily living in dementia patients on a short term geriatric psychiatric inpatient it
A randomized, controlled, single-blinded, between group study of 24 participants with moderate to severe dementia was conducted on a geriatric psychiatric unit. All participants received pharmacological therapy, occupational therapy, structured hospital environment, and were randomized to receive multi sensory behavior therapy (MSBT) or a structured activity session. Greater independence in activities of daily living (ADLs) was observed for the group treated with MSBT and standard psychiatric inpatient care on the Katz Index of Activities of Daily Living (KI-ADL; P = 0.05) than standard psychiatric inpatient care alone. The combination treatment of MSBT and standard psychiatric care also reduced agitation and apathy greater than standard psychiatric inpatient care alone as measured with the Pittsburgh Agitation Scale and the Scale for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms in Alzheimer's Disease (P = 0.05). Multiple regression analysis predicted that within the multi-sensory group, activities of daily living (KI-ADL) increased as apathy and agitation reduced (R2 = 0.42; p = 0.03). These data suggest that utilizing MSBT with standard psychiatric inpatient care may reduce apathy and agitation and additionally improve activities of daily living in hospitalized people with moderate to severe dementia more than standard care alone.
Snoezelen, multi-sensory therapy, agitation therapy, dementia, behavior therapy, activities of daily living
0091-2174
357-370
Staal, Jason A.
7dd5dca2-c3eb-4731-9419-91b77d2a9d94
Sacks, Amanda
059d3d0e-8e94-42c6-a817-ec2b8c0c7e7d
Matheis, Robert
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Collier, Lesley
2ea87419-cbc4-4ef3-95e0-516b510b0cab
Calia, Tina
4bd37cd4-7643-4763-b9a3-db4b68ff1ae2
Hanif, Henry
ad2557b0-35ff-47d7-ab07-20a4ad72b89e
Hofman, Eugene S.
d90ca412-6875-4a23-a2bb-1d7d941e6914
Staal, Jason A.
7dd5dca2-c3eb-4731-9419-91b77d2a9d94
Sacks, Amanda
059d3d0e-8e94-42c6-a817-ec2b8c0c7e7d
Matheis, Robert
7f863b6c-94f8-47b4-8481-f60173824c23
Collier, Lesley
2ea87419-cbc4-4ef3-95e0-516b510b0cab
Calia, Tina
4bd37cd4-7643-4763-b9a3-db4b68ff1ae2
Hanif, Henry
ad2557b0-35ff-47d7-ab07-20a4ad72b89e
Hofman, Eugene S.
d90ca412-6875-4a23-a2bb-1d7d941e6914

Staal, Jason A., Sacks, Amanda, Matheis, Robert, Collier, Lesley, Calia, Tina, Hanif, Henry and Hofman, Eugene S. (2007) The effects of Snoezelen (multi-sensory behavior therapy) and psychiatric care on agitation, apathy, and activities of daily living in dementia patients on a short term geriatric psychiatric inpatient it. The International Journal of Psychiatry in Medicine, 37 (4), 357-370. (doi:10.2090/PM.37.4.a). (PMID:18441625)

Record type: Article

Abstract

A randomized, controlled, single-blinded, between group study of 24 participants with moderate to severe dementia was conducted on a geriatric psychiatric unit. All participants received pharmacological therapy, occupational therapy, structured hospital environment, and were randomized to receive multi sensory behavior therapy (MSBT) or a structured activity session. Greater independence in activities of daily living (ADLs) was observed for the group treated with MSBT and standard psychiatric inpatient care on the Katz Index of Activities of Daily Living (KI-ADL; P = 0.05) than standard psychiatric inpatient care alone. The combination treatment of MSBT and standard psychiatric care also reduced agitation and apathy greater than standard psychiatric inpatient care alone as measured with the Pittsburgh Agitation Scale and the Scale for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms in Alzheimer's Disease (P = 0.05). Multiple regression analysis predicted that within the multi-sensory group, activities of daily living (KI-ADL) increased as apathy and agitation reduced (R2 = 0.42; p = 0.03). These data suggest that utilizing MSBT with standard psychiatric inpatient care may reduce apathy and agitation and additionally improve activities of daily living in hospitalized people with moderate to severe dementia more than standard care alone.

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Published date: 2007
Keywords: Snoezelen, multi-sensory therapy, agitation therapy, dementia, behavior therapy, activities of daily living
Organisations: Faculty of Health Sciences

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Local EPrints ID: 354609
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/354609
ISSN: 0091-2174
PURE UUID: 68a51209-b6f9-4c9f-93c3-5a152a9e11a0
ORCID for Lesley Collier: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3788-3420

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Date deposited: 16 Jul 2013 10:44
Last modified: 06 Aug 2019 18:49

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Contributors

Author: Jason A. Staal
Author: Amanda Sacks
Author: Robert Matheis
Author: Lesley Collier ORCID iD
Author: Tina Calia
Author: Henry Hanif
Author: Eugene S. Hofman

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