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Quantifying possible transmission network benefits from higher cable conductor temperatures

Quantifying possible transmission network benefits from higher cable conductor temperatures
Quantifying possible transmission network benefits from higher cable conductor temperatures
The maximum current rating of high voltage power cables is limited by the allowable conductor temperature, in order to prevent damage to the adjacent dielectric material. Cross-linked polyethylene dielectrics are generally subject to a thermal limit of 90°C in the UK. The use of novel new dielectric materials may allow this temperature limit to be raised considerably. This paper examines the possible thermal rating benefits available from 400kV cable systems capable of conductor temperatures of up to 150°C in a number of common deployment scenarios, including direct burial and installation in ventilated tunnels. The results of the analysis show a divide between modest improvements in continuous rating and much more utilizable gains in short term emergency ratings which could offer the possibilities of single cable circuits being able to match the current carrying capacity of overhead lines over 24hr periods.
1751-8687
636
Pilgrim, J.A.
4b4f7933-1cd8-474f-bf69-39cefc376ab7
Lewin, P.L.
78b4fc49-1cb3-4db9-ba90-3ae70c0f639e
Gorwadia, A.
cd7380cd-28bc-485a-9327-392780c9adbb
Waite, F.
be5a6916-87b3-4a5d-9c0d-1e6e3d9d4b55
Payne, D.
f0cba199-0bda-4ca7-97b1-481e3ad6c073
Pilgrim, J.A.
4b4f7933-1cd8-474f-bf69-39cefc376ab7
Lewin, P.L.
78b4fc49-1cb3-4db9-ba90-3ae70c0f639e
Gorwadia, A.
cd7380cd-28bc-485a-9327-392780c9adbb
Waite, F.
be5a6916-87b3-4a5d-9c0d-1e6e3d9d4b55
Payne, D.
f0cba199-0bda-4ca7-97b1-481e3ad6c073

Pilgrim, J.A., Lewin, P.L., Gorwadia, A., Waite, F. and Payne, D. (2013) Quantifying possible transmission network benefits from higher cable conductor temperatures. IET Generation, Transmission & Distribution, 7 (6), 636. (doi:10.1049/iet-gtd.2012.0004).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The maximum current rating of high voltage power cables is limited by the allowable conductor temperature, in order to prevent damage to the adjacent dielectric material. Cross-linked polyethylene dielectrics are generally subject to a thermal limit of 90°C in the UK. The use of novel new dielectric materials may allow this temperature limit to be raised considerably. This paper examines the possible thermal rating benefits available from 400kV cable systems capable of conductor temperatures of up to 150°C in a number of common deployment scenarios, including direct burial and installation in ventilated tunnels. The results of the analysis show a divide between modest improvements in continuous rating and much more utilizable gains in short term emergency ratings which could offer the possibilities of single cable circuits being able to match the current carrying capacity of overhead lines over 24hr periods.

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Published date: June 2013
Organisations: EEE

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 354660
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/354660
ISSN: 1751-8687
PURE UUID: 73e1d4f4-aaba-41dc-a881-38212fd1cc13
ORCID for J.A. Pilgrim: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2444-2116

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Date deposited: 17 Jul 2013 10:08
Last modified: 21 Nov 2021 02:57

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Contributors

Author: J.A. Pilgrim ORCID iD
Author: P.L. Lewin
Author: A. Gorwadia
Author: F. Waite
Author: D. Payne

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