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The consequences of ‘accounting regulation without accountants’: The case of UK political parties

The consequences of ‘accounting regulation without accountants’: The case of UK political parties
The consequences of ‘accounting regulation without accountants’: The case of UK political parties
Concerns about a lack of accountability and transparency often lead to calls for 'more' accounting information and regulation. The process of determining, and changing, the accounting rules normally involves the accounting profession to guide any 'accounting intervention' by state or non-state institutions. But what would happen if a state regulator instead does not rely on the profession to issue accounting guidance? This paper sets out the process and consequences of an ‘accounting regulation without accountants’ in the context of UK political parties. Drawing primarily from published documents and supplemented by interviews, the paper reviews the developments (primarily since 1998) leading to the need for a common set of accounts for political parties and how it was implemented by the UK Electoral Commission (EC). The actual consequences of this accounting regime are analysed from the different perspectives previously used in understanding the forms of, and motivations for, of accounting regulation. The paper’s empirics and analysis form the basis of a broader debate on the potentially uncritical use, and unintended consequences, of ‘accounting logic’ and ‘transparency through accounting’ initiatives by policy-makers.
accounting regulation, political parties, financial accounting, United Kingdom, transparency
Soobaroyen, Teerooven
6686e2f8-564f-4f7f-b079-9dc8a2f53a48
Soobaroyen, Teerooven
6686e2f8-564f-4f7f-b079-9dc8a2f53a48

Soobaroyen, Teerooven (2012) The consequences of ‘accounting regulation without accountants’: The case of UK political parties. Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Accounting Conference 2012. 11 - 13 Jul 2013. 37 pp .

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Concerns about a lack of accountability and transparency often lead to calls for 'more' accounting information and regulation. The process of determining, and changing, the accounting rules normally involves the accounting profession to guide any 'accounting intervention' by state or non-state institutions. But what would happen if a state regulator instead does not rely on the profession to issue accounting guidance? This paper sets out the process and consequences of an ‘accounting regulation without accountants’ in the context of UK political parties. Drawing primarily from published documents and supplemented by interviews, the paper reviews the developments (primarily since 1998) leading to the need for a common set of accounts for political parties and how it was implemented by the UK Electoral Commission (EC). The actual consequences of this accounting regime are analysed from the different perspectives previously used in understanding the forms of, and motivations for, of accounting regulation. The paper’s empirics and analysis form the basis of a broader debate on the potentially uncritical use, and unintended consequences, of ‘accounting logic’ and ‘transparency through accounting’ initiatives by policy-makers.

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More information

Published date: 11 July 2012
Venue - Dates: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Accounting Conference 2012, 2013-07-11 - 2013-07-13
Keywords: accounting regulation, political parties, financial accounting, United Kingdom, transparency
Organisations: Centre of Excellence in Decision, Analytics & Risk Research

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 354749
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/354749
PURE UUID: 980e1489-e92c-45bb-ab67-92ab9c4c2099

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 31 Jul 2013 14:17
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 03:53

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Contributors

Author: Teerooven Soobaroyen

University divisions

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