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Apparent mass of the human body in the vertical direction: Effect of footrest and a steering wheel

Apparent mass of the human body in the vertical direction: Effect of footrest and a steering wheel
Apparent mass of the human body in the vertical direction: Effect of footrest and a steering wheel
The apparent mass of the seated human body influences the vibration transmitted through a car seat. The apparent mass of the body is known to be influenced by sitting posture but the influence of the position of the hands and the feet is not well understood. This study was designed to quantify the influence of steering wheel location and the position of a footrest on the vertical apparent mass of the human body. The influences of the forces applied by the hands to a steering wheel and by the feet to a footrest were also investigated. Twelve subjects were exposed to whole-body vertical random vibration (1.0 m s?2 rms over the frequency range 0.13–40.0 Hz) while supported by a rigid seat with a backrest reclined to 15°. The apparent mass of the body was measured with five horizontal positions and three vertical positions of a steering wheel and also with hands in the lap, and with five horizontal positions of a footrest. The influence of five forward forces (0, 50, 100, 150, 200 N) applied separately to the ‘steering wheel’ and the footrest were also investigated as well as a ‘no backrest’ condition. With their hands in their laps, subjects exhibited a resonance around 6.7 Hz, compared to 4.8 Hz when sitting upright with no backrest. In the same posture holding a steering wheel, the mass supported on the seat surface decreased and there was an additional resonance at 4 Hz. Moving the steering wheel away from the body reduced the apparent mass at the primary resonance frequency and increased the apparent mass around the 4 Hz resonance. As the feet moved forward, the mass supported on the seat surface decreased, indicating that the backrest and footrest supported a greater proportion of the subject weight. Applying force to either the steering wheel or the footrest reduced the apparent mass at resonance and decreased the mass supported on the seat surface. It is concluded that the positions and contact conditions of the hands and the feet affect the biodynamic response of the body in a car driving posture. As the biodynamic response influences the vibration transmitted through seats, these factors should be considered in dynamic models of vehicle seating.

0022-460X
1586-1596
Toward, Martin G.R.
1d10e993-e6ef-449d-bccb-1f8198169bee
Griffin, Michael J.
24112494-9774-40cb-91b7-5b4afe3c41b8
Toward, Martin G.R.
1d10e993-e6ef-449d-bccb-1f8198169bee
Griffin, Michael J.
24112494-9774-40cb-91b7-5b4afe3c41b8

Toward, Martin G.R. and Griffin, Michael J. (2010) Apparent mass of the human body in the vertical direction: Effect of footrest and a steering wheel. Journal of Sound and Vibration, 329 (9), 1586-1596. (doi:10.1016/j.jsv.2009.11.015).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The apparent mass of the seated human body influences the vibration transmitted through a car seat. The apparent mass of the body is known to be influenced by sitting posture but the influence of the position of the hands and the feet is not well understood. This study was designed to quantify the influence of steering wheel location and the position of a footrest on the vertical apparent mass of the human body. The influences of the forces applied by the hands to a steering wheel and by the feet to a footrest were also investigated. Twelve subjects were exposed to whole-body vertical random vibration (1.0 m s?2 rms over the frequency range 0.13–40.0 Hz) while supported by a rigid seat with a backrest reclined to 15°. The apparent mass of the body was measured with five horizontal positions and three vertical positions of a steering wheel and also with hands in the lap, and with five horizontal positions of a footrest. The influence of five forward forces (0, 50, 100, 150, 200 N) applied separately to the ‘steering wheel’ and the footrest were also investigated as well as a ‘no backrest’ condition. With their hands in their laps, subjects exhibited a resonance around 6.7 Hz, compared to 4.8 Hz when sitting upright with no backrest. In the same posture holding a steering wheel, the mass supported on the seat surface decreased and there was an additional resonance at 4 Hz. Moving the steering wheel away from the body reduced the apparent mass at the primary resonance frequency and increased the apparent mass around the 4 Hz resonance. As the feet moved forward, the mass supported on the seat surface decreased, indicating that the backrest and footrest supported a greater proportion of the subject weight. Applying force to either the steering wheel or the footrest reduced the apparent mass at resonance and decreased the mass supported on the seat surface. It is concluded that the positions and contact conditions of the hands and the feet affect the biodynamic response of the body in a car driving posture. As the biodynamic response influences the vibration transmitted through seats, these factors should be considered in dynamic models of vehicle seating.

Text
14655 MGRT-MJG 2010 Effect_of_footrest_and_steering_wheel_on_vertical_apparent_mass - Accepted Manuscript
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Published date: 26 April 2010
Organisations: Human Sciences Group, Institute of Sound & Vibration Research

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 354922
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/354922
ISSN: 0022-460X
PURE UUID: 75a2d8bc-e9d9-4b81-84a4-437123d3b123
ORCID for Michael J. Griffin: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0743-9502

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Date deposited: 23 Jul 2013 08:43
Last modified: 15 Aug 2019 00:57

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