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Motion sickness with combined lateral and roll oscillation: effect of percentage compensation

Motion sickness with combined lateral and roll oscillation: effect of percentage compensation
Motion sickness with combined lateral and roll oscillation: effect of percentage compensation
Background: Both lateral acceleration and roll through the force of gravity produce lateral forces. On a tilting-train the tilt offsets lateral acceleration so as to improve the physical comfort of passengers, but motion sickness is believed to increase as the lateral force is reduced by increased roll (i.e., as the percentage roll compensation is increased). Objectives: We investigated how motion sickness caused by combined lateral acceleration and roll displacement depended on the percentage compensation. Method: There were 8 groups of 20 subjects who were exposed for up to 30 min to various conditions of combined lateral and roll oscillation: 3 groups of 20 subjects experienced 0.2 Hz oscillation with 1 of 3 compensations (0, 50, or 100%) and 5 groups of 20 subjects experienced 0.1 Hz oscillation with 1 of 5 compensations (0, 25, 50, 75, or 100%). With both frequencies of sinusoidal oscillation, the peak Earth-lateral acceleration was 1.26 m · s?2. Subjects provided ratings of their motion sickness symptoms at 1-min intervals. Results: The percentage compensation had significant effects on motion sickness. With 0.2 Hz oscillation, 50% roll-compensation of lateral oscillation produced less motion sickness than uncompensated lateral oscillation, and less motion sickness than 100% roll-compensated lateral oscillation. With 0.1 Hz oscillation, 25% roll-compensation of lateral oscillation produced significantly less motion sickness than either 75% or 100% roll-compensated lateral oscillation. Conclusions: Motion sickness caused by combined lateral and roll oscillation is dependent on the percentage compensation and cannot be predicted by models based on only lateral oscillation or only roll oscillation
motion sickness, oscillation, lateral, roll, compensation
0095-6562
22-29
Donohew, Barnaby Edward
0d907d0f-0d97-4d28-a0a7-481a8f6d844d
Griffin, Michael J.
24112494-9774-40cb-91b7-5b4afe3c41b8
Donohew, Barnaby Edward
0d907d0f-0d97-4d28-a0a7-481a8f6d844d
Griffin, Michael J.
24112494-9774-40cb-91b7-5b4afe3c41b8

Donohew, Barnaby Edward and Griffin, Michael J. (2010) Motion sickness with combined lateral and roll oscillation: effect of percentage compensation. Aviation, Space and Environmental Medicine, 81 (1), 22-29. (doi:10.3357/ASEM.2555.2010).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: Both lateral acceleration and roll through the force of gravity produce lateral forces. On a tilting-train the tilt offsets lateral acceleration so as to improve the physical comfort of passengers, but motion sickness is believed to increase as the lateral force is reduced by increased roll (i.e., as the percentage roll compensation is increased). Objectives: We investigated how motion sickness caused by combined lateral acceleration and roll displacement depended on the percentage compensation. Method: There were 8 groups of 20 subjects who were exposed for up to 30 min to various conditions of combined lateral and roll oscillation: 3 groups of 20 subjects experienced 0.2 Hz oscillation with 1 of 3 compensations (0, 50, or 100%) and 5 groups of 20 subjects experienced 0.1 Hz oscillation with 1 of 5 compensations (0, 25, 50, 75, or 100%). With both frequencies of sinusoidal oscillation, the peak Earth-lateral acceleration was 1.26 m · s?2. Subjects provided ratings of their motion sickness symptoms at 1-min intervals. Results: The percentage compensation had significant effects on motion sickness. With 0.2 Hz oscillation, 50% roll-compensation of lateral oscillation produced less motion sickness than uncompensated lateral oscillation, and less motion sickness than 100% roll-compensated lateral oscillation. With 0.1 Hz oscillation, 25% roll-compensation of lateral oscillation produced significantly less motion sickness than either 75% or 100% roll-compensated lateral oscillation. Conclusions: Motion sickness caused by combined lateral and roll oscillation is dependent on the percentage compensation and cannot be predicted by models based on only lateral oscillation or only roll oscillation

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: January 2010
Keywords: motion sickness, oscillation, lateral, roll, compensation
Organisations: Human Sciences Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 354924
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/354924
ISSN: 0095-6562
PURE UUID: 13e322e1-3bfe-4bb9-9980-0c1adaeb8436
ORCID for Michael J. Griffin: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0743-9502

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 23 Jul 2013 09:03
Last modified: 18 Jul 2019 01:25

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