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Frequency-dependence of psychophysical and physiological responses to hand-transmitted vibration

Frequency-dependence of psychophysical and physiological responses to hand-transmitted vibration
Frequency-dependence of psychophysical and physiological responses to hand-transmitted vibration
This invited paper reviews experimental studies of the frequency-dependence of absolute thresholds for the perception of vibration, equivalent comfort contours, temporary changes in sensation caused by vibration, and reductions in finger blood flow caused by hand-transmitted vibration. Absolute thresholds depend on the contact conditions but for a typical hand grip the thresholds show greatest sensitivity to acceleration around 125 Hz. The frequency-dependence of discomfort caused by hand-transmitted vibration depends on vibration magnitude: similar to absolute thresholds at low magnitudes, but the discomfort at higher magnitudes is similar when the vibration velocity is similar (at frequencies between about 16 and 400 Hz). Hand-transmitted vibration induces temporary elevations in vibrotactile thresholds that reflect the sensory mechanisms excited by the vibration and are therefore highly dependent on the frequency of vibration. Handtransmitted vibration reduces finger blood flow during and after exposure; when the vibration velocity is similar at all frequencies there is more vasoconstriction at frequencies greater than 63 Hz than at lower frequencies. A single frequency weighting cannot provide a good indication of how all effects of hand-transmitted vibration depend on vibration frequency. Furthermore, a single frequency weighting provides only an approximate indication of any single response, because many factors influence the frequency-dependence of responses to hand-transmitted vibration, including the magnitude of vibration, contact conditions, and individual differences. Although the frequency weighting in current standards extends from 8 to 1,000 Hz, frequencies greater than 400 Hz rarely increase the weighted value on tools and there is currently little psychophysical or physiological evidence of their effects.
vibration, hand, perception, comfort, vascular, syndrome, vibration-induced white finger
0019-8366
354-369
Griffin, M.J.
24112494-9774-40cb-91b7-5b4afe3c41b8
Griffin, M.J.
24112494-9774-40cb-91b7-5b4afe3c41b8

Griffin, M.J. (2012) Frequency-dependence of psychophysical and physiological responses to hand-transmitted vibration. Industrial Health, 50 (5), 354-369.

Record type: Article

Abstract

This invited paper reviews experimental studies of the frequency-dependence of absolute thresholds for the perception of vibration, equivalent comfort contours, temporary changes in sensation caused by vibration, and reductions in finger blood flow caused by hand-transmitted vibration. Absolute thresholds depend on the contact conditions but for a typical hand grip the thresholds show greatest sensitivity to acceleration around 125 Hz. The frequency-dependence of discomfort caused by hand-transmitted vibration depends on vibration magnitude: similar to absolute thresholds at low magnitudes, but the discomfort at higher magnitudes is similar when the vibration velocity is similar (at frequencies between about 16 and 400 Hz). Hand-transmitted vibration induces temporary elevations in vibrotactile thresholds that reflect the sensory mechanisms excited by the vibration and are therefore highly dependent on the frequency of vibration. Handtransmitted vibration reduces finger blood flow during and after exposure; when the vibration velocity is similar at all frequencies there is more vasoconstriction at frequencies greater than 63 Hz than at lower frequencies. A single frequency weighting cannot provide a good indication of how all effects of hand-transmitted vibration depend on vibration frequency. Furthermore, a single frequency weighting provides only an approximate indication of any single response, because many factors influence the frequency-dependence of responses to hand-transmitted vibration, including the magnitude of vibration, contact conditions, and individual differences. Although the frequency weighting in current standards extends from 8 to 1,000 Hz, frequencies greater than 400 Hz rarely increase the weighted value on tools and there is currently little psychophysical or physiological evidence of their effects.

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2018_11_12 14717 Author accepted manuscript - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Published date: 2012
Keywords: vibration, hand, perception, comfort, vascular, syndrome, vibration-induced white finger
Organisations: Human Sciences Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 354944
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/354944
ISSN: 0019-8366
PURE UUID: 0e4e4b43-4f56-4ede-bf6c-46c2a8de5edf
ORCID for M.J. Griffin: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0743-9502

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Date deposited: 23 Jul 2013 13:17
Last modified: 22 Jul 2022 18:37

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Author: M.J. Griffin ORCID iD

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