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Acute effects of mechanical shocks on finger blood flow: Influence of shock repetition rate and shock magnitude

Acute effects of mechanical shocks on finger blood flow: Influence of shock repetition rate and shock magnitude
Acute effects of mechanical shocks on finger blood flow: Influence of shock repetition rate and shock magnitude
Objectives
Finger blood flow is reduced by hand-transmitted vibration but there has been little study of the peripheral vascular response to repetitive mechanical shocks. This study investigated how reductions in finger blood flow depend on shock repetition rate and the peak and rms magnitude of acceleration.

Methods
Subjects attended seven sessions: six with repetitive mechanical shocks and a control session with no shocks. Each session comprised five successive 5-min periods: (1) no force and no vibration, (2) force and no vibration, (3) force and vibration, (4) force and no vibration and (5) no force and no vibration. During the second–fourth periods, the palm of the right hand applied 2-N force to a vibrator. During the third period, a 125-Hz mechanical shock was applied with one of four repetition rates (1.3, 5.3, 21 or 83.3/s) and one of three acceleration magnitudes (2.5, 5 or 10 ms?2 rms, unweighted). Finger blood flow was measured every 30 s in the middle and little fingers of the right (exposed) hand and the left (unexposed) hand.

Results
Different repetition rates (1.3–83.3 s?1) and different peak magnitudes (10–88 ms?2 peak) but the same rms acceleration (10 ms?2 rms) caused similar decreases in blood flow in fingers on exposed and unexposed hands. Shocks with a 83.3 s?1 repetition rate, peak magnitude of 10 ms?2 and rms acceleration of 10 ms?2 provoked greater reduction in finger blood flow than shocks with the same peak magnitude but lower repetition rate (21 or 5.3 s?1) and lower rms acceleration (5 or 2.5 ms?2).

Conclusions
For shocks similar to those based on 125-Hz oscillations with repetition rates between 1.3 and 83.3 s?1, acute reductions in finger blood flow can be predicted from the rms acceleration.
hand-transmitted vibration, shocks, vibration-induced white finger, hand–arm vibration syndrome, finger blood flow
0340-0131
605-614
Ye, Ying
5cfc9fff-c24f-4e7c-8a97-c78436d79966
Mauro, Marcella
c72aeb1a-be45-42d6-be41-449f79a7b771
Bovenzi, Massimo
fc8fbd59-6c3f-46f1-b8f5-2a00b759857c
Griffin, Michael J.
24112494-9774-40cb-91b7-5b4afe3c41b8
Ye, Ying
5cfc9fff-c24f-4e7c-8a97-c78436d79966
Mauro, Marcella
c72aeb1a-be45-42d6-be41-449f79a7b771
Bovenzi, Massimo
fc8fbd59-6c3f-46f1-b8f5-2a00b759857c
Griffin, Michael J.
24112494-9774-40cb-91b7-5b4afe3c41b8

Ye, Ying, Mauro, Marcella, Bovenzi, Massimo and Griffin, Michael J. (2012) Acute effects of mechanical shocks on finger blood flow: Influence of shock repetition rate and shock magnitude. International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, 85 (6), 605-614. (doi:10.1007/s00420-011-0704-x). (PMID:21964880)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Objectives
Finger blood flow is reduced by hand-transmitted vibration but there has been little study of the peripheral vascular response to repetitive mechanical shocks. This study investigated how reductions in finger blood flow depend on shock repetition rate and the peak and rms magnitude of acceleration.

Methods
Subjects attended seven sessions: six with repetitive mechanical shocks and a control session with no shocks. Each session comprised five successive 5-min periods: (1) no force and no vibration, (2) force and no vibration, (3) force and vibration, (4) force and no vibration and (5) no force and no vibration. During the second–fourth periods, the palm of the right hand applied 2-N force to a vibrator. During the third period, a 125-Hz mechanical shock was applied with one of four repetition rates (1.3, 5.3, 21 or 83.3/s) and one of three acceleration magnitudes (2.5, 5 or 10 ms?2 rms, unweighted). Finger blood flow was measured every 30 s in the middle and little fingers of the right (exposed) hand and the left (unexposed) hand.

Results
Different repetition rates (1.3–83.3 s?1) and different peak magnitudes (10–88 ms?2 peak) but the same rms acceleration (10 ms?2 rms) caused similar decreases in blood flow in fingers on exposed and unexposed hands. Shocks with a 83.3 s?1 repetition rate, peak magnitude of 10 ms?2 and rms acceleration of 10 ms?2 provoked greater reduction in finger blood flow than shocks with the same peak magnitude but lower repetition rate (21 or 5.3 s?1) and lower rms acceleration (5 or 2.5 ms?2).

Conclusions
For shocks similar to those based on 125-Hz oscillations with repetition rates between 1.3 and 83.3 s?1, acute reductions in finger blood flow can be predicted from the rms acceleration.

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 2 October 2011
Published date: August 2012
Keywords: hand-transmitted vibration, shocks, vibration-induced white finger, hand–arm vibration syndrome, finger blood flow
Organisations: Human Sciences Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 354951
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/354951
ISSN: 0340-0131
PURE UUID: d530a109-c47f-4477-a2f2-564738f0d23c
ORCID for Ying Ye: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7721-5451
ORCID for Michael J. Griffin: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0743-9502

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 24 Jul 2013 09:59
Last modified: 01 Jun 2022 01:41

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Contributors

Author: Ying Ye ORCID iD
Author: Marcella Mauro
Author: Massimo Bovenzi
Author: Michael J. Griffin ORCID iD

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