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Characterization of electromechanical transduction in polyelectrolyte gels for mechanical sensor applications

Characterization of electromechanical transduction in polyelectrolyte gels for mechanical sensor applications
Characterization of electromechanical transduction in polyelectrolyte gels for mechanical sensor applications
We report a new experimental method for the characterization of the electromechanical properties of polyelectrolyte gels (PG). PGs have been studied extensively, but with limited success, as mechanical actuators. However, they are also promising as potentially biocompatible mechanical sensors. In order to integrate them into actual devices, their electromechanical transduction properties need to be characterized in a reproducible manner.

We have therefore developed a technique to measure the mechanically induced change in electrostatic potential in PGs. The polyelectrolyte gel is subjected to a well-defined pressure gradient by placing a thin, flat sample on a substrate with integrated concentric Platinum electrodes and indenting it with a spherical indenter. The potential values at the electrodes are measured using a MOSFET operational amplifier circuit with an input impedance of 1014 Ù and an effective dynamic range better than 16 bit. This method can be directly used to quantify electromechanical coupling in polyelectrolyte gels
1946-4274
Prudnikova, Katsiaryna
962af200-b8b4-478c-835b-c26c61f1114e
Utz, Marcel
c84ed64c-9e89-4051-af39-d401e423891b
Prudnikova, Katsiaryna
962af200-b8b4-478c-835b-c26c61f1114e
Utz, Marcel
c84ed64c-9e89-4051-af39-d401e423891b

Prudnikova, Katsiaryna and Utz, Marcel (2007) Characterization of electromechanical transduction in polyelectrolyte gels for mechanical sensor applications. MRS Proceedings, 1006. (doi:10.1557/PROC-1006-R07-07).

Record type: Article

Abstract

We report a new experimental method for the characterization of the electromechanical properties of polyelectrolyte gels (PG). PGs have been studied extensively, but with limited success, as mechanical actuators. However, they are also promising as potentially biocompatible mechanical sensors. In order to integrate them into actual devices, their electromechanical transduction properties need to be characterized in a reproducible manner.

We have therefore developed a technique to measure the mechanically induced change in electrostatic potential in PGs. The polyelectrolyte gel is subjected to a well-defined pressure gradient by placing a thin, flat sample on a substrate with integrated concentric Platinum electrodes and indenting it with a spherical indenter. The potential values at the electrodes are measured using a MOSFET operational amplifier circuit with an input impedance of 1014 Ù and an effective dynamic range better than 16 bit. This method can be directly used to quantify electromechanical coupling in polyelectrolyte gels

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More information

Published date: 2007
Organisations: Magnetic Resonance

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 355554
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/355554
ISSN: 1946-4274
PURE UUID: d9dd1915-4423-40f2-9960-55c9bc1cdb94
ORCID for Marcel Utz: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-2274-9672

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 18 Oct 2013 15:26
Last modified: 14 Jul 2018 00:30

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