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Energy harvesting from solar cells under typical illumination conditions in buildings

Energy harvesting from solar cells under typical illumination conditions in buildings
Energy harvesting from solar cells under typical illumination conditions in buildings
Energy harvesting powered devices have the potential for widespread use in buildings. The most prevalent ambient energy source available in buildings is light, which is normally harvested using photovoltaic devices. The light to be harvested can be from both natural and artificial sources and a range of different types of solar cells are available to suit differing light sources and intensities, and as such must be selected to suit the type of light to be encountered. For use inside buildings it is desirable to choose a device which will operate efficiently under artificial lighting as many locations have limited or no natural light, however, the nature of artificial sources is changing over time from incandescent sources, through fluorescent lights, with LED lights currently attracting significant interest due to energy savings. This paper presents an investigation into the selection of solar cell type for a range of artificial lighting sources and illumination levels.
Li, Yi
76dfac3c-5e81-4b4e-8887-98e9d91dd119
Grabham, Neil J.
00695728-6280-4d06-a943-29142f2547c9
Beeby, Steve P.
ba565001-2812-4300-89f1-fe5a437ecb0d
Tudor, John
46eea408-2246-4aa0-8b44-86169ed601ff
Li, Yi
76dfac3c-5e81-4b4e-8887-98e9d91dd119
Grabham, Neil J.
00695728-6280-4d06-a943-29142f2547c9
Beeby, Steve P.
ba565001-2812-4300-89f1-fe5a437ecb0d
Tudor, John
46eea408-2246-4aa0-8b44-86169ed601ff

Li, Yi, Grabham, Neil J., Beeby, Steve P. and Tudor, John (2013) Energy harvesting from solar cells under typical illumination conditions in buildings. At Nano Energy 2013 Nano Energy 2013, Italy. 10 - 13 Jul 2013.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Poster)

Abstract

Energy harvesting powered devices have the potential for widespread use in buildings. The most prevalent ambient energy source available in buildings is light, which is normally harvested using photovoltaic devices. The light to be harvested can be from both natural and artificial sources and a range of different types of solar cells are available to suit differing light sources and intensities, and as such must be selected to suit the type of light to be encountered. For use inside buildings it is desirable to choose a device which will operate efficiently under artificial lighting as many locations have limited or no natural light, however, the nature of artificial sources is changing over time from incandescent sources, through fluorescent lights, with LED lights currently attracting significant interest due to energy savings. This paper presents an investigation into the selection of solar cell type for a range of artificial lighting sources and illumination levels.

PDF Nanoenergy2013_Abstract_solar_yi Draft v1 4.pdf - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Published date: 13 July 2013
Additional Information: Poster published in NanoEnergy Letters 2013.
Venue - Dates: Nano Energy 2013, Italy, 2013-07-10 - 2013-07-13
Organisations: EEE

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 355658
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/355658
PURE UUID: 71fd1e3f-af29-4d0c-ac08-a4f2243cc596
ORCID for Neil J. Grabham: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6385-0331
ORCID for Steve P. Beeby: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-0800-1759

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 04 Sep 2013 13:37
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 13:07

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