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Inherited predisposition to myeloproliferative neoplasms

Inherited predisposition to myeloproliferative neoplasms
Inherited predisposition to myeloproliferative neoplasms
Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) are haematological disorders characterized by an overproduction of mature myeloid cells with a tendency to transform to acute myeloid leukaemia. Clonal proliferation of myeloid progenitor cells is driven by somatically acquired mutations, most notably JAK2 V617F, but there are important features relating to pathogenesis and phenotypic diversity that cannot be explained by acquired mutations alone. In this review we consider what is currently known about the role that inherited factors play in the development and biology of both sporadic and familial forms of MPN. Although most MPN cases appear to be sporadic, familial predisposition has been recognized for many years in a subset of cases and epidemiological studies have indicated the presence of common susceptibility alleles. Currently the JAK2 46/1 haplotype (also referred to as ‘GGCC’) is the strongest known predisposition factor for sporadic MPNs carrying a JAK2 V617F mutation, explaining a large proportion of the heritability of this disorder. Less is known about what genetic variants predispose to MPNs that lack JAK2 V617F, but there have been recent reports of interesting associations in biologically plausible candidates, and more loci are set to emerge with the application of systematic genome-wide association methodologies. Several highly penetrant predisposition variants that affect erythropoietin signalling, thrombopoietin signalling or oxygen sensing have been characterized in families with nonclonal hereditary erythrocytosis or thrombocytosis, but much less is known about familial predisposition to true clonal MPN. The heterogeneous pattern of inheritance and presumed genetic heterogeneity in these families makes analysis difficult, but whole exome or genome sequencing should provide novel insights into these elusive disorders.
myeloprolifertive neoplasms, familial myeloproliferative neoplasms, inherited predisposition, JAK2 46/1 haplotype
2040-6207
237-253
Jones, A.V.
daa5d0cf-4454-48c3-abb8-daf03aa21e8b
Cross, N.C.P.
f87650da-b908-4a34-b31b-d62c5f186fe4
Jones, A.V.
daa5d0cf-4454-48c3-abb8-daf03aa21e8b
Cross, N.C.P.
f87650da-b908-4a34-b31b-d62c5f186fe4

Jones, A.V. and Cross, N.C.P. (2013) Inherited predisposition to myeloproliferative neoplasms. Therapeutic Advances in Hematology, 4 (4), 237-253. (doi:10.1177/2040620713489144).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) are haematological disorders characterized by an overproduction of mature myeloid cells with a tendency to transform to acute myeloid leukaemia. Clonal proliferation of myeloid progenitor cells is driven by somatically acquired mutations, most notably JAK2 V617F, but there are important features relating to pathogenesis and phenotypic diversity that cannot be explained by acquired mutations alone. In this review we consider what is currently known about the role that inherited factors play in the development and biology of both sporadic and familial forms of MPN. Although most MPN cases appear to be sporadic, familial predisposition has been recognized for many years in a subset of cases and epidemiological studies have indicated the presence of common susceptibility alleles. Currently the JAK2 46/1 haplotype (also referred to as ‘GGCC’) is the strongest known predisposition factor for sporadic MPNs carrying a JAK2 V617F mutation, explaining a large proportion of the heritability of this disorder. Less is known about what genetic variants predispose to MPNs that lack JAK2 V617F, but there have been recent reports of interesting associations in biologically plausible candidates, and more loci are set to emerge with the application of systematic genome-wide association methodologies. Several highly penetrant predisposition variants that affect erythropoietin signalling, thrombopoietin signalling or oxygen sensing have been characterized in families with nonclonal hereditary erythrocytosis or thrombocytosis, but much less is known about familial predisposition to true clonal MPN. The heterogeneous pattern of inheritance and presumed genetic heterogeneity in these families makes analysis difficult, but whole exome or genome sequencing should provide novel insights into these elusive disorders.

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More information

Published date: August 2013
Keywords: myeloprolifertive neoplasms, familial myeloproliferative neoplasms, inherited predisposition, JAK2 46/1 haplotype
Organisations: Human Development & Health

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 355691
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/355691
ISSN: 2040-6207
PURE UUID: c58c30d7-b179-43f5-a94c-d049dcb4d12f
ORCID for N.C.P. Cross: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5481-2555

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 03 Sep 2013 15:33
Last modified: 09 Jan 2022 03:08

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Contributors

Author: A.V. Jones
Author: N.C.P. Cross ORCID iD

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