The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Soil bacteria, nitrite and the skin

Soil bacteria, nitrite and the skin
Soil bacteria, nitrite and the skin
Little is known about the composition of the skin microbiome and its potential significance for health and disease in the context of the ‘hygiene hypothesis’. We here propose that mammals evolved with a dermal microflora that contributed to the regulation of body physiology by providing nitrite from commensal ammonia-oxidising bacteria in response to ammonia released during sweating. We further hypothesise that modern skin hygiene practices have led to a gradual loss of these bacteria from our skin. Together with other lifestyle-related changes associated with an insufficient bodily supply with nitrite and depletion of other nitric oxide(NO)-related species, a condition we here define as ‘nitropenia’, this has led to a perturbation of cellular redox signalling which manifests as dysregulated immunity and generalised inflammation. If proven correct, this scenario would provide an additional evolutionary rationale and a mechanistic basis for the simultaneous rises in prevalence of a number of seemingly unrelated chronic illnesses over the last 3–4 decades.
immunology, infectious diseases, medical microbiology, cell biology
978-3-7643-8902-4
103-115
Springer
Whitlock, David
c1f9b245-a214-461c-b988-56f1a494c2e5
Feelisch, Martin
8c1b9965-8614-4e85-b2c6-458a2e17eafd
Rook, Graham A.W.
Whitlock, David
c1f9b245-a214-461c-b988-56f1a494c2e5
Feelisch, Martin
8c1b9965-8614-4e85-b2c6-458a2e17eafd
Rook, Graham A.W.

Whitlock, David and Feelisch, Martin (2009) Soil bacteria, nitrite and the skin. In, Rook, Graham A.W. (ed.) The Hygiene Hypothesis and Darwinian Medicine. Springer, pp. 103-115. (doi:10.1007/978-3-7643-8903-1_6).

Record type: Book Section

Abstract

Little is known about the composition of the skin microbiome and its potential significance for health and disease in the context of the ‘hygiene hypothesis’. We here propose that mammals evolved with a dermal microflora that contributed to the regulation of body physiology by providing nitrite from commensal ammonia-oxidising bacteria in response to ammonia released during sweating. We further hypothesise that modern skin hygiene practices have led to a gradual loss of these bacteria from our skin. Together with other lifestyle-related changes associated with an insufficient bodily supply with nitrite and depletion of other nitric oxide(NO)-related species, a condition we here define as ‘nitropenia’, this has led to a perturbation of cellular redox signalling which manifests as dysregulated immunity and generalised inflammation. If proven correct, this scenario would provide an additional evolutionary rationale and a mechanistic basis for the simultaneous rises in prevalence of a number of seemingly unrelated chronic illnesses over the last 3–4 decades.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 2009
Keywords: immunology, infectious diseases, medical microbiology, cell biology
Organisations: Faculty of Medicine

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 355751
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/355751
ISBN: 978-3-7643-8902-4
PURE UUID: cbdc7c51-16ff-45f7-92b2-664be66fd5fc
ORCID for Martin Feelisch: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-2320-1158

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 05 Sep 2013 08:49
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 12:29

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: David Whitlock
Author: Martin Feelisch ORCID iD
Editor: Graham A.W. Rook

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×