The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository
Warning ePrints Soton is experiencing an issue with some file downloads not being available. We are working hard to fix this. Please bear with us.

Planktic foraminifers and hydrography of the eastern and northern Caribbean Sea

Planktic foraminifers and hydrography of the eastern and northern Caribbean Sea
Planktic foraminifers and hydrography of the eastern and northern Caribbean Sea
The distribution of living planktic foraminifers and their relation to the hydrography of the Caribbean Sea was investigated in plankton net tows and surface sediment samples taken along the Antilles island arc during April/May 1996. The planktic foraminiferal community was strongly influenced by spatial variations in salinity that were largely due to the influx of Orinoco River water into the southeastern Caribbean Sea and inflowing Sargasso Sea water in the north. Along the Antilles island arc, Globigerinoides ruber was the dominant species in the surface waters throughout. In the southeastern Caribbean Sea, where Orinoco River outflow influences the planktic community, standing stocks of planktic foraminifers (>100 ?m) between 4 and 50 specimens m?3 were medium to low. The southeastern faunas between Tobago and Guadeloupe were characterized by increased proportions of Neogloboquadrina dutertrei. Highest standing stocks of 159 specimens m?3 in the upper 20 m of the water column were recorded in the northeastern Caribbean Sea and the assemblages were characterized by high proportions of Globigerinita glutinata, associated with cyclonic eddies. In the Anegada Passage, where Sargasso Sea water flows into the Caribbean Sea, low standing stocks of 18 specimens m?3 indicate oligotrophic conditions. Together with the oligotrophic surface waters, the Subtropical Underwater enters the Caribbean Sea through the Anegada Passage in water depths between 100 and 300 m. These waters are characterized by higher concentrations of Globorotalia truncatulinoides relative to the adjacent water masses. Comparison of the living planktic foraminiferal fauna with empty test assemblages from the water column and from surface sediments shows that differences in the faunal composition mostly correspond to the distribution of water masses and to the differential dissolution of species. In the vicinity of islands Globigerinoides ruber reaches higher relative frequencies than in the open ocean, pointing towards a higher tolerance of this species towards neritic conditions than in other species.
planktic foraminifers, population dynamics, ecology, hydrography, Caribbean Sea
0377-8398
387-403
Schmuker, B.
f0fae431-e4b8-49f2-b242-3d1483b095fb
Schiebel, R.
e3ee9c3f-ae96-4523-8ec2-2ed7acdfb83a
Schmuker, B.
f0fae431-e4b8-49f2-b242-3d1483b095fb
Schiebel, R.
e3ee9c3f-ae96-4523-8ec2-2ed7acdfb83a

Schmuker, B. and Schiebel, R. (2002) Planktic foraminifers and hydrography of the eastern and northern Caribbean Sea. Marine Micropaleontology, 46 (3-4), 387-403. (doi:10.1016/S0377-8398(02)00082-8).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The distribution of living planktic foraminifers and their relation to the hydrography of the Caribbean Sea was investigated in plankton net tows and surface sediment samples taken along the Antilles island arc during April/May 1996. The planktic foraminiferal community was strongly influenced by spatial variations in salinity that were largely due to the influx of Orinoco River water into the southeastern Caribbean Sea and inflowing Sargasso Sea water in the north. Along the Antilles island arc, Globigerinoides ruber was the dominant species in the surface waters throughout. In the southeastern Caribbean Sea, where Orinoco River outflow influences the planktic community, standing stocks of planktic foraminifers (>100 ?m) between 4 and 50 specimens m?3 were medium to low. The southeastern faunas between Tobago and Guadeloupe were characterized by increased proportions of Neogloboquadrina dutertrei. Highest standing stocks of 159 specimens m?3 in the upper 20 m of the water column were recorded in the northeastern Caribbean Sea and the assemblages were characterized by high proportions of Globigerinita glutinata, associated with cyclonic eddies. In the Anegada Passage, where Sargasso Sea water flows into the Caribbean Sea, low standing stocks of 18 specimens m?3 indicate oligotrophic conditions. Together with the oligotrophic surface waters, the Subtropical Underwater enters the Caribbean Sea through the Anegada Passage in water depths between 100 and 300 m. These waters are characterized by higher concentrations of Globorotalia truncatulinoides relative to the adjacent water masses. Comparison of the living planktic foraminiferal fauna with empty test assemblages from the water column and from surface sediments shows that differences in the faunal composition mostly correspond to the distribution of water masses and to the differential dissolution of species. In the vicinity of islands Globigerinoides ruber reaches higher relative frequencies than in the open ocean, pointing towards a higher tolerance of this species towards neritic conditions than in other species.

This record has no associated files available for download.

More information

Published date: 2002
Keywords: planktic foraminifers, population dynamics, ecology, hydrography, Caribbean Sea

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 35591
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/35591
ISSN: 0377-8398
PURE UUID: 5fc996a4-fbf0-4a15-9e9a-7590dc973fdc

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 22 May 2006
Last modified: 09 Nov 2021 08:00

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: B. Schmuker
Author: R. Schiebel

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×