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Patients' perceptions of the potential of breathing training for asthma: a qualitative study

Patients' perceptions of the potential of breathing training for asthma: a qualitative study
Patients' perceptions of the potential of breathing training for asthma: a qualitative study
Background: Poor symptom control is common in asthma. Breathing training exercises may be an effective adjunct to medication; it is therefore important to understand facilitators and barriers to uptake of breathing training exercises.

Aims: To gain insight into patients’ perceptions of breathing training exercises designed to help control asthma symptoms.

Methods: Semi-structured think-aloud interviews were conducted with 29 people with asthma about their views of a booklet on breathing training exercises.

Results: Thematic analysis showed breathing training exercises were seen as acceptable in principle because they were viewed as nonpharmacological, holistic, unobtrusive, and likely to increase patient confidence in managing symptoms. Anticipated disadvantages included the time required and perceived irrelevance for those with well-controlled asthma. These views were influenced by prior experience of changing breathing, wanting to self-manage asthma, negative views of medication, and perceived asthma control/severity. Anticipated barriers to carrying out the exercises included difficulties with nose breathing, remembering to do them, and persevering with them. Anticipated facilitators included monitoring tools and social support.

Conclusions: The idea of breathing training was viewed positively as an acceptable non-pharmacological treatment that patients can do discreetly to help them breathe more easily and reduce their reliance on medication. Uptake of breathing training may be greater among those who perceive their asthma as severe and/or have negative views of medication. To enhance uptake, it might be helpful to present breathing training exercises as holistic skills that can also benefit those with mild symptoms.
qualitative, asthma, breathing training, perceptions
1471-4418
449-53
Arden-Close, Emily
476eebfb-e256-474b-8351-09db1efdeab5
Teasdale, Emma
f156de5f-e83e-40c0-aafa-0c95dd17aa80
Tonkin-Crine, Sarah
65679835-9bdc-48b6-92f3-cc6322cccc4f
Pitre, N.
3c8e539d-4e0e-406b-8389-94e59356ad57
Stafford-Watson, Mark
7ba38b36-ca0f-4b9c-8c07-dfe25a519c19
Gibson, Denise
a777f689-579e-478e-a8cc-6b3b85451595
Bruton, Anne
9f8b6076-6558-4d99-b7c8-72b03796ed95
Thomas, D.M.
997c78e0-3849-4ce8-b1bc-86ebbdee3953
Yardley, Lucy
64be42c4-511d-484d-abaa-f8813452a22e
Arden-Close, Emily
476eebfb-e256-474b-8351-09db1efdeab5
Teasdale, Emma
f156de5f-e83e-40c0-aafa-0c95dd17aa80
Tonkin-Crine, Sarah
65679835-9bdc-48b6-92f3-cc6322cccc4f
Pitre, N.
3c8e539d-4e0e-406b-8389-94e59356ad57
Stafford-Watson, Mark
7ba38b36-ca0f-4b9c-8c07-dfe25a519c19
Gibson, Denise
a777f689-579e-478e-a8cc-6b3b85451595
Bruton, Anne
9f8b6076-6558-4d99-b7c8-72b03796ed95
Thomas, D.M.
997c78e0-3849-4ce8-b1bc-86ebbdee3953
Yardley, Lucy
64be42c4-511d-484d-abaa-f8813452a22e

Arden-Close, Emily, Teasdale, Emma, Tonkin-Crine, Sarah, Pitre, N., Stafford-Watson, Mark, Gibson, Denise, Bruton, Anne, Thomas, D.M. and Yardley, Lucy (2013) Patients' perceptions of the potential of breathing training for asthma: a qualitative study. Primary Care Respiratory Journal, 22 (4), 449-53. (doi:10.4104/pcrj.2013.00092). (PMID:24227105)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: Poor symptom control is common in asthma. Breathing training exercises may be an effective adjunct to medication; it is therefore important to understand facilitators and barriers to uptake of breathing training exercises.

Aims: To gain insight into patients’ perceptions of breathing training exercises designed to help control asthma symptoms.

Methods: Semi-structured think-aloud interviews were conducted with 29 people with asthma about their views of a booklet on breathing training exercises.

Results: Thematic analysis showed breathing training exercises were seen as acceptable in principle because they were viewed as nonpharmacological, holistic, unobtrusive, and likely to increase patient confidence in managing symptoms. Anticipated disadvantages included the time required and perceived irrelevance for those with well-controlled asthma. These views were influenced by prior experience of changing breathing, wanting to self-manage asthma, negative views of medication, and perceived asthma control/severity. Anticipated barriers to carrying out the exercises included difficulties with nose breathing, remembering to do them, and persevering with them. Anticipated facilitators included monitoring tools and social support.

Conclusions: The idea of breathing training was viewed positively as an acceptable non-pharmacological treatment that patients can do discreetly to help them breathe more easily and reduce their reliance on medication. Uptake of breathing training may be greater among those who perceive their asthma as severe and/or have negative views of medication. To enhance uptake, it might be helpful to present breathing training exercises as holistic skills that can also benefit those with mild symptoms.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 14 November 2013
Published date: December 2013
Keywords: qualitative, asthma, breathing training, perceptions
Organisations: Faculty of Health Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 356029
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/356029
ISSN: 1471-4418
PURE UUID: 9c0458b5-06c8-40a5-9723-b295f9272250
ORCID for Anne Bruton: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4550-2536

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 26 Nov 2013 13:46
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 13:04

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