The psychological benefits of income are contingent on individual-level and culture-level religiosity


Gebauer, J.E., Nehrlich, A.D., Sedikides, C. and Neberich, W. (2012) The psychological benefits of income are contingent on individual-level and culture-level religiosity Social Psychological and Personality Science, 4, (5), pp. 569-578. (doi:10.1177/1948550612469819).

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Description/Abstract

Higher income is related to better psychological adjustment. We propose that religiosity attenuates this relation. First, in comforting the poor, religious teachings de-emphasize the importance of money, which would buffer low-income's psychological harms (religiosity as poverty buffer account). Second, religious teachings convey antiwealth norms, which would reduce income's psychological benefits (religiosity as antiwealth norms account). A study involving 187,957 respondents from 11 religiously diverse cultures showed that individual-level, as well as culture-level, religiosity weakens the relation between personal income and psychological adjustment in accordance with the religiosity as antiwealth norms account. Performance self-esteem mediated this relation. Religiosity's moderating effects were so pervasive that religious individuals in religious cultures reported better psychological adjustment when their income was low than high.

Item Type: Article
Digital Object Identifier (DOI): doi:10.1177/1948550612469819
ISSNs: 1948-5506 (print)
Keywords: religiosity, culture, income, self-esteem, psychological, adjustment
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BL Religion
H Social Sciences > HC Economic History and Conditions
Organisations: Psychology
ePrint ID: 356074
Date :
Date Event
20 December 2012e-pub ahead of print
6 August 2013Published
Date Deposited: 22 Aug 2013 15:55
Last Modified: 17 Apr 2017 15:02
Further Information:Google Scholar
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/356074

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