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Growth and development under alternative corruption regimes

Growth and development under alternative corruption regimes
Growth and development under alternative corruption regimes
Empirical observation suggests that not all countries of the world have suffered as a result of widespread corruption. Whilst many countries have undoubtedly been damaged considerably, others appear to have coped well - in some cases, very well - with the problem. The analysis that follows seeks to provide an explanation for this puzzle. It does so by differentiating alternative types of corruption regime according to the way that corruption is practised. Specifically, we distinguish between organised and disorganised, collusive and non collusive corruption. This gives four possible scenarios, the implications of which are compared and contrasted to provide a ranking of regimes in terms of their impact on growth. We find that the least (most) damaging regime is one in which corruption is both organised and collusive (disorganised and non-collusive), as broadly characterises the situation in China and its fast-growing neighbours (many African countries)
137
University of Manchester
Blackburn, Keith
6481dae3-fe0e-4c24-8278-2a3197cfe77d
Wang, Yuanyuan
3a880197-fe32-45fd-bd74-1949270e2ad8
Blackburn, Keith
6481dae3-fe0e-4c24-8278-2a3197cfe77d
Wang, Yuanyuan
3a880197-fe32-45fd-bd74-1949270e2ad8

Blackburn, Keith and Wang, Yuanyuan (2010) Growth and development under alternative corruption regimes (Centre for Growth and Business Cycle Research Discussion Paper Series, 137) Manchester, GB. University of Manchester 25pp.

Record type: Monograph (Discussion Paper)

Abstract

Empirical observation suggests that not all countries of the world have suffered as a result of widespread corruption. Whilst many countries have undoubtedly been damaged considerably, others appear to have coped well - in some cases, very well - with the problem. The analysis that follows seeks to provide an explanation for this puzzle. It does so by differentiating alternative types of corruption regime according to the way that corruption is practised. Specifically, we distinguish between organised and disorganised, collusive and non collusive corruption. This gives four possible scenarios, the implications of which are compared and contrasted to provide a ranking of regimes in terms of their impact on growth. We find that the least (most) damaging regime is one in which corruption is both organised and collusive (disorganised and non-collusive), as broadly characterises the situation in China and its fast-growing neighbours (many African countries)

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Published date: May 2010
Organisations: Economics

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 356273
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/356273
PURE UUID: 8e489c40-26e7-444a-9c6e-6a9c45df9194

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Date deposited: 07 Oct 2013 10:03
Last modified: 08 Apr 2019 16:32

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Contributors

Author: Keith Blackburn
Author: Yuanyuan Wang

University divisions

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