The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Detecting anthropogenic carbon dioxide uptake and ocean acidification in the North Atlantic Ocean

Detecting anthropogenic carbon dioxide uptake and ocean acidification in the North Atlantic Ocean
Detecting anthropogenic carbon dioxide uptake and ocean acidification in the North Atlantic Ocean
Fossil fuel use, cement manufacture and land-use changes are the primary sources of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) to the atmosphere, with the ocean absorbing approximately 30% (Sabine et al., 2004). Ocean uptake and chemical equilibration of anthropogenic CO2 with seawater results in a gradual reduction in seawater pH and saturation states (?) for calcium carbonate (CaCO3) minerals in a process termed ocean acidification. Assessing the present and future impact of ocean acidification on marine ecosystems requires detection of the multi-decadal rate of change across ocean basins and at ocean time-series sites. Here, we show the longest continuous record of ocean CO2 changes and ocean acidification in the North Atlantic subtropical gyre near Bermuda from 1983–2011. Dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) increased in surface seawater by ~40 ?mol kg?1 and ~50 ?atm (~20%), respectively. Increasing Revelle factor (?) values imply that the capacity of North Atlantic surface waters to absorb CO2 has also diminished. As indicators of ocean acidification, seawater pH decreased by ~0.05 (0.0017 yr?1) and ? values by ~7–8%. Such data provide critically needed multi-decadal information for assessing the North Atlantic Ocean CO2 sink and the pH changes that determine marine ecosystem responses to ocean acidification.
1726-4170
2509-2522
Bates, N.R.
954a83d6-8424-49e9-8acd-e606221c9c57
Best, M.H.P.
df4a1160-e1e1-43c6-a55f-2900043007cc
Neely, K.
777d27ca-6dc4-408e-9839-29c83230518a
Garley, R.
d23dffe7-041d-460b-b06a-ff103da9d388
Dickson, A.G.
8ae78eef-65fa-47fb-80e3-c8e1e4fa08eb
Johnson, R.J.
de7c575d-7078-460f-b305-8c4a7c248a8b
Bates, N.R.
954a83d6-8424-49e9-8acd-e606221c9c57
Best, M.H.P.
df4a1160-e1e1-43c6-a55f-2900043007cc
Neely, K.
777d27ca-6dc4-408e-9839-29c83230518a
Garley, R.
d23dffe7-041d-460b-b06a-ff103da9d388
Dickson, A.G.
8ae78eef-65fa-47fb-80e3-c8e1e4fa08eb
Johnson, R.J.
de7c575d-7078-460f-b305-8c4a7c248a8b

Bates, N.R., Best, M.H.P., Neely, K., Garley, R., Dickson, A.G. and Johnson, R.J. (2012) Detecting anthropogenic carbon dioxide uptake and ocean acidification in the North Atlantic Ocean. Biogeosciences, 9 (7), 2509-2522. (doi:10.5194/bg-9-2509-2012).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Fossil fuel use, cement manufacture and land-use changes are the primary sources of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) to the atmosphere, with the ocean absorbing approximately 30% (Sabine et al., 2004). Ocean uptake and chemical equilibration of anthropogenic CO2 with seawater results in a gradual reduction in seawater pH and saturation states (?) for calcium carbonate (CaCO3) minerals in a process termed ocean acidification. Assessing the present and future impact of ocean acidification on marine ecosystems requires detection of the multi-decadal rate of change across ocean basins and at ocean time-series sites. Here, we show the longest continuous record of ocean CO2 changes and ocean acidification in the North Atlantic subtropical gyre near Bermuda from 1983–2011. Dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) increased in surface seawater by ~40 ?mol kg?1 and ~50 ?atm (~20%), respectively. Increasing Revelle factor (?) values imply that the capacity of North Atlantic surface waters to absorb CO2 has also diminished. As indicators of ocean acidification, seawater pH decreased by ~0.05 (0.0017 yr?1) and ? values by ~7–8%. Such data provide critically needed multi-decadal information for assessing the North Atlantic Ocean CO2 sink and the pH changes that determine marine ecosystem responses to ocean acidification.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 11 July 2012
Additional Information: Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License
Organisations: Ocean Biochemistry & Ecosystems

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 356533
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/356533
ISSN: 1726-4170
PURE UUID: 88023a78-ac1c-42f8-b515-af6c1ba55132

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 06 Sep 2013 09:02
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 03:38

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×