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Seasonal influenza vaccination predicts pandemic H1N1 vaccination uptake among healthcare workers in three countries

Seasonal influenza vaccination predicts pandemic H1N1 vaccination uptake among healthcare workers in three countries
Seasonal influenza vaccination predicts pandemic H1N1 vaccination uptake among healthcare workers in three countries
The aim of this study was to identify the common barriers and facilitators for acceptance of pandemic influenza vaccination across different countries. This study utilized a standardized, anonymous, self-completed questionnaire-based survey recording the demographics and professional practice, previous experience and perceived risk and severity of influenza, infection control practices, information of H1N1 vaccination, acceptance of the H1N1 vaccination and reasons of their choices and opinions on mandatory vaccination. Hospital-based doctors, nurses and allied healthcare workers in Hong Kong (HK), Singapore (SG) and Leicester, United Kingdom (UK) were recruited. A total of 6318 (HK: 5743, SG: 300, UK: 275) questionnaires were distributed, with response rates of 27.1% (HK), 94.7% (SG) and 94.5% (UK). The uptake rates for monovalent 2009 pandemic H1N1 vaccine were 13.5% (HK), 36.2% (SG) and 41.3% (UK). The single common factor associated with vaccine acceptance across all sites was having seasonal influenza vaccination in 2009. In UK and HK, overestimation of side effect reduced vaccination acceptance; and fear of side effect was a significant barrier in all sites. In HK, healthcare workers with more patient contact were more reluctant to accept vaccination. Drivers for vaccination in UK and HK were concern about catching the infection and following advice from health authority. Only a small proportion of respondents agreed with mandatory pandemic influenza vaccination (HK: 25% and UK: 42%), except in Singapore where 75.3% were in agreement. Few respondents (<5%) chose scientific publications as their primary source of information, but this group was more likely to receive vaccination. The acceptance of pandemic vaccine among healthcare workers was poor (13-41% of respondents). Breaking barriers to accept seasonal influenza vaccination should be part of the influenza pandemic preparedness plan. Mandatory vaccination even during pandemic is likely to arouse substantial discontent.

influenza, H1N1, vaccination, pandemic vaccine, health care workers, standardized questionnaire
7364-7369
Chor, J.S.
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Pada, S.K.
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Stephenson, I.
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Goggin, W.B.
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Tambyah, P.A.
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Clark, T.W.
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Medina, M.
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Lee, N.
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Leung, T.F.
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Ngai, K.L.
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Law, S.K.
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Rainer, T.H.
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Griffiths, S.
45c60a1e-e2c8-4e33-bbbb-f450c9bc13ac
Chan, P.K
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Chor, J.S.
ad9ffe07-94a8-45bc-b744-7a934062bdc7
Pada, S.K.
6f6a7ab7-e55e-4ec5-9084-ed28562940a6
Stephenson, I.
cffd5c3c-042f-4902-a2c3-b07b7b79a470
Goggin, W.B.
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Tambyah, P.A.
02b74323-8dba-4b2a-9169-9d1f546abde2
Clark, T.W.
712ec18e-613c-45df-a013-c8a22834e14f
Medina, M.
f27014e1-08dd-4e35-b480-d05f48aa8b36
Lee, N.
78a65697-823f-4128-bfa2-cc9443403e07
Leung, T.F.
a08cff3a-ce12-45cf-b606-e8cd10f2c325
Ngai, K.L.
117ea99c-bbf9-4771-80f9-8aa8ac6bfd30
Law, S.K.
fac34cca-0ce8-4ac0-b327-6b639ec91ba5
Rainer, T.H.
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Griffiths, S.
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Chan, P.K
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Chor, J.S., Pada, S.K., Stephenson, I., Goggin, W.B., Tambyah, P.A., Clark, T.W., Medina, M., Lee, N., Leung, T.F., Ngai, K.L., Law, S.K., Rainer, T.H., Griffiths, S. and Chan, P.K (2011) Seasonal influenza vaccination predicts pandemic H1N1 vaccination uptake among healthcare workers in three countries. [in special issue: Special Section - Universal Influenza Vaccination of Children: Food for Thought] Vaccine, 29 (43), 7364-7369. (doi:10.1016/j.vaccine.2011.07.079). (PMID:21807048)

Record type: Article

Abstract

The aim of this study was to identify the common barriers and facilitators for acceptance of pandemic influenza vaccination across different countries. This study utilized a standardized, anonymous, self-completed questionnaire-based survey recording the demographics and professional practice, previous experience and perceived risk and severity of influenza, infection control practices, information of H1N1 vaccination, acceptance of the H1N1 vaccination and reasons of their choices and opinions on mandatory vaccination. Hospital-based doctors, nurses and allied healthcare workers in Hong Kong (HK), Singapore (SG) and Leicester, United Kingdom (UK) were recruited. A total of 6318 (HK: 5743, SG: 300, UK: 275) questionnaires were distributed, with response rates of 27.1% (HK), 94.7% (SG) and 94.5% (UK). The uptake rates for monovalent 2009 pandemic H1N1 vaccine were 13.5% (HK), 36.2% (SG) and 41.3% (UK). The single common factor associated with vaccine acceptance across all sites was having seasonal influenza vaccination in 2009. In UK and HK, overestimation of side effect reduced vaccination acceptance; and fear of side effect was a significant barrier in all sites. In HK, healthcare workers with more patient contact were more reluctant to accept vaccination. Drivers for vaccination in UK and HK were concern about catching the infection and following advice from health authority. Only a small proportion of respondents agreed with mandatory pandemic influenza vaccination (HK: 25% and UK: 42%), except in Singapore where 75.3% were in agreement. Few respondents (<5%) chose scientific publications as their primary source of information, but this group was more likely to receive vaccination. The acceptance of pandemic vaccine among healthcare workers was poor (13-41% of respondents). Breaking barriers to accept seasonal influenza vaccination should be part of the influenza pandemic preparedness plan. Mandatory vaccination even during pandemic is likely to arouse substantial discontent.

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 30 July 2011
Published date: 6 October 2011
Keywords: influenza, H1N1, vaccination, pandemic vaccine, health care workers, standardized questionnaire
Organisations: Faculty of Medicine

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 356779
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/356779
PURE UUID: 801d48b2-24d0-431d-ac20-c99237668cdd
ORCID for T.W. Clark: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-6026-5295

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 25 Sep 2013 16:09
Last modified: 03 Dec 2019 01:35

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Contributors

Author: J.S. Chor
Author: S.K. Pada
Author: I. Stephenson
Author: W.B. Goggin
Author: P.A. Tambyah
Author: T.W. Clark ORCID iD
Author: M. Medina
Author: N. Lee
Author: T.F. Leung
Author: K.L. Ngai
Author: S.K. Law
Author: T.H. Rainer
Author: S. Griffiths
Author: P.K Chan

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