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Autonomy: Risk Assessment

Autonomy: Risk Assessment
Autonomy: Risk Assessment
Oceanography and ocean observation in general is ever trending toward both automated in situ observation and working in extreme environments. These goals can only be met by de?risking the technology and deployment practices to acceptable levels of risks. A number of industries have standardised risk management processes to support the design and development of their systems. The lack of formal risk assessment of autonomous ocean vehicles has hindered the potential for true autonomy, which is required for exploring unstructured and unexplored environments. When discussing risks different stakeholders may have different consequences foremost in mind. For example the vehicle owner may be interested in risk of loss, whereas the user is interested in risk of vehicle unavailability. Other risks, such as legal risks and risk of collision, affect all stakeholders. This chapter presents a risk management process using several methods tailored to autonomous ocean
vehicles in which risk assessment is a key component.
23p
Springer
Brito, M.P.
82e798e7-e032-4841-992e-81c6f13a9e6c
Griffiths, G.
2887c3c7-95f2-4834-b3f6-0284344d3580
Dhanak, M.R.
Xiros, N.I.
Curtin, T.
Brito, M.P.
82e798e7-e032-4841-992e-81c6f13a9e6c
Griffiths, G.
2887c3c7-95f2-4834-b3f6-0284344d3580
Dhanak, M.R.
Xiros, N.I.
Curtin, T.

Brito, M.P. and Griffiths, G. (2016) Autonomy: Risk Assessment. In, Dhanak, M.R., Xiros, N.I. and Curtin, T. (eds.) Springer Handbook of Ocean Engineering. Part B: Autonomous Ocean Vehicles, Subsystems and Control. Springer, 23p. (doi:10.1007/978-3-319-16649-0_24).

Record type: Book Section

Abstract

Oceanography and ocean observation in general is ever trending toward both automated in situ observation and working in extreme environments. These goals can only be met by de?risking the technology and deployment practices to acceptable levels of risks. A number of industries have standardised risk management processes to support the design and development of their systems. The lack of formal risk assessment of autonomous ocean vehicles has hindered the potential for true autonomy, which is required for exploring unstructured and unexplored environments. When discussing risks different stakeholders may have different consequences foremost in mind. For example the vehicle owner may be interested in risk of loss, whereas the user is interested in risk of vehicle unavailability. Other risks, such as legal risks and risk of collision, affect all stakeholders. This chapter presents a risk management process using several methods tailored to autonomous ocean
vehicles in which risk assessment is a key component.

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Published date: 2016
Organisations: Ocean Technology and Engineering

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Local EPrints ID: 356884
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/356884
PURE UUID: 093faa01-664b-479f-b1c9-b18174b2d9b1

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Date deposited: 16 Sep 2013 13:59
Last modified: 19 Jul 2019 21:27

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Contributors

Author: M.P. Brito
Author: G. Griffiths
Editor: M.R. Dhanak
Editor: N.I. Xiros
Editor: T. Curtin

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