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Microfabrication of dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators for flow control

Microfabrication of dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators for flow control
Microfabrication of dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators for flow control
Dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuators are a popular type of actuator used in active flow control. However, their performance and broader application are restricted by the manufacturing methods currently employed. A methodology is proposed, with an emphasis on material durability when exposed to plasma, to build more robust plasma actuators, which takes advantage of microfabrication techniques. Thin film electrodes are precisely deposited onto alkali free borosilicate glass substrates, which resist degradation in the presence of plasma, resulting in the batch construction of repeatable actuators with consistent physical and operational properties. The robustness of different electrode materials to the plasma environment is considered via SEM images, EDX elemental analysis and through the homogeneity of the plasma formation.
0924-4247
101-104
Houser, N.M.
5b4126e2-1dde-49f5-906e-62ec891500fb
Gimeno, L.
4e29a833-bba0-4ef4-8863-e01c84f81f85
Hanson, R.E.
32c4b840-4052-4c62-b87c-d3721c2896d4
Goldhawk, T.
4f2b7ea5-2f88-4934-879d-7bf17adeefa4
Simpson, T.
ca5d0375-fa32-4773-b8f5-ce059fb0df1d
Lavoie, P.
37bb9e97-3872-44c4-bfcd-d9b4e9295ff2
Houser, N.M.
5b4126e2-1dde-49f5-906e-62ec891500fb
Gimeno, L.
4e29a833-bba0-4ef4-8863-e01c84f81f85
Hanson, R.E.
32c4b840-4052-4c62-b87c-d3721c2896d4
Goldhawk, T.
4f2b7ea5-2f88-4934-879d-7bf17adeefa4
Simpson, T.
ca5d0375-fa32-4773-b8f5-ce059fb0df1d
Lavoie, P.
37bb9e97-3872-44c4-bfcd-d9b4e9295ff2

Houser, N.M., Gimeno, L., Hanson, R.E., Goldhawk, T., Simpson, T. and Lavoie, P. (2013) Microfabrication of dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators for flow control. Sensors and Actuators A: Physical, 201, 101-104. (doi:10.1016/j.sna.2013.06.005).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuators are a popular type of actuator used in active flow control. However, their performance and broader application are restricted by the manufacturing methods currently employed. A methodology is proposed, with an emphasis on material durability when exposed to plasma, to build more robust plasma actuators, which takes advantage of microfabrication techniques. Thin film electrodes are precisely deposited onto alkali free borosilicate glass substrates, which resist degradation in the presence of plasma, resulting in the batch construction of repeatable actuators with consistent physical and operational properties. The robustness of different electrode materials to the plasma environment is considered via SEM images, EDX elemental analysis and through the homogeneity of the plasma formation.

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More information

Published date: 2013
Organisations: Aerodynamics & Flight Mechanics Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 356936
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/356936
ISSN: 0924-4247
PURE UUID: ba193c07-e9fc-4f4d-ba55-5c9f59822d01

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 23 Sep 2013 12:07
Last modified: 09 Nov 2021 00:33

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Contributors

Author: N.M. Houser
Author: L. Gimeno
Author: R.E. Hanson
Author: T. Goldhawk
Author: T. Simpson
Author: P. Lavoie

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