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Development of an ambient temperature alkaline electrolyser for dynamic operation with renewable energy sources

Development of an ambient temperature alkaline electrolyser for dynamic operation with renewable energy sources
Development of an ambient temperature alkaline electrolyser for dynamic operation with renewable energy sources
A comparison is made between the ambient and conventional temperature alkaline electrolysers in terms of operational system, voltage efficiency and corrosion rates. The capital, operational and maintenance costs are reduced by reducing auxiliary equipment as well as auxiliary utilities in the ambient temperature alkaline electrolyser. Also, since auxiliary electricity consumption is reduced, the alkaline electrolyser is capable for dynamic, continuous and fast-response operation with renewable energy sources. The ambient temperature alkaline electrolyser is capable for wider operational range and faster response time when powered by wind energy sources. Although the voltage efficiency for hydrogen production is increased by about 12% at the conventional operating temperature, corrosion rate of the electrode is increased by a factor of about 6.3. The voltage efficiency for hydrogen production, however, is increased by about 12% by employing electrocatalyst in the ambient temperature alkaline electrolyser, and there is benefit of enhancing lifetime durability of the electrode as well as cell components at relatively lower operating temperature
alkaline electrolyser, renewable energy sources, hydrogen energy systems, electrode
0360-3199
723-739
Douglas, Tamunosaki Graham
64509019-8d76-42d7-b464-f96923d2fc02
Cruden, Andrew
ed709997-4402-49a7-9ad5-f4f3c62d29ab
Infield, David
4c9a5342-a1b9-4041-b85d-557184fcef05
Douglas, Tamunosaki Graham
64509019-8d76-42d7-b464-f96923d2fc02
Cruden, Andrew
ed709997-4402-49a7-9ad5-f4f3c62d29ab
Infield, David
4c9a5342-a1b9-4041-b85d-557184fcef05

Douglas, Tamunosaki Graham, Cruden, Andrew and Infield, David (2013) Development of an ambient temperature alkaline electrolyser for dynamic operation with renewable energy sources. International Journal of Hydrogen Energy, 38 (2), 723-739. (doi:10.1016/j.ijhydene.2012.10.071).

Record type: Article

Abstract

A comparison is made between the ambient and conventional temperature alkaline electrolysers in terms of operational system, voltage efficiency and corrosion rates. The capital, operational and maintenance costs are reduced by reducing auxiliary equipment as well as auxiliary utilities in the ambient temperature alkaline electrolyser. Also, since auxiliary electricity consumption is reduced, the alkaline electrolyser is capable for dynamic, continuous and fast-response operation with renewable energy sources. The ambient temperature alkaline electrolyser is capable for wider operational range and faster response time when powered by wind energy sources. Although the voltage efficiency for hydrogen production is increased by about 12% at the conventional operating temperature, corrosion rate of the electrode is increased by a factor of about 6.3. The voltage efficiency for hydrogen production, however, is increased by about 12% by employing electrocatalyst in the ambient temperature alkaline electrolyser, and there is benefit of enhancing lifetime durability of the electrode as well as cell components at relatively lower operating temperature

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Published date: 2013
Keywords: alkaline electrolyser, renewable energy sources, hydrogen energy systems, electrode
Organisations: Engineering Science Unit

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 357443
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/357443
ISSN: 0360-3199
PURE UUID: e7db6379-fc93-437d-8e5d-a619eb6c7d65
ORCID for Andrew Cruden: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3236-2535

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 07 Oct 2013 14:00
Last modified: 20 Jul 2019 00:41

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Contributors

Author: Tamunosaki Graham Douglas
Author: Andrew Cruden ORCID iD
Author: David Infield

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