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Characterisation of crevice and pit solution chemistries using capillary electrophoresis with contactless conductivity detector

Characterisation of crevice and pit solution chemistries using capillary electrophoresis with contactless conductivity detector
Characterisation of crevice and pit solution chemistries using capillary electrophoresis with contactless conductivity detector
The ability to predict structural degradation in-service is often limited by a lack of understanding of the evolving chemical species occurring within a range of different microenvironments associated with corrosion sites. Capillary electrophoresis (CE) is capable of analysing nanolitre solution volumes with widely disparate concentrations of ionic species, thereby producing accurate and reliable results for the analysis of the chemical compositions found within microenvironment corrosion solutions, such as those found at crevice and pit corrosion sites. In this study, CE with contactless conductivity detection (CCD) has been used to characterize pitting and crevice corrosion solution chemistries for the first time. By using the capillary electrophoresis with contactless conductivity detection (CE-CCD) system, direct and simultaneous detection of seven metal cations (Cu2+, Ni2+, Fe3+, Fe2+, Cr3+, Mn2+, and Al3+) and chloride anions was achieved with a buffer solution of 10 mM 2,6-pyridinedicarboxylic acid and 0.5 mM cetyltrimethylammonium hydroxide at pH 4 using a pre-column complexation method. The detection limits obtained for the metal cations and chloride anions were 100 and 10 ppb, respectively. The CE-CCD methodology has been demonstrated to be a versatile technique capable of speciation and quantifying the ionic species generated within artificial pit (a pencil electrode) and crevice corrosion geometries for carbon steels and nickel-aluminium bronze, thus allowing the evolution of the solution chemistry to be assessed with time and the identification of the key corrosion analyte targets for structural health monitoring
structural health monitoring, corrosion solution chemistries, corrosion monitoring, capillary electrophoresis, contactless conductivity detection
4345-4360
Nie, Mengyan
a8613738-d74a-40fb-8881-08069fb0a34b
Wharton, J.A.
965a38fd-d2bc-4a19-a08c-2d4e036aa96b
Cranny, Andy
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Harris, N.R.
237cfdbd-86e4-4025-869c-c85136f14dfd
Wood, Robert J.K.
d9523d31-41a8-459a-8831-70e29ffe8a73
Stokes, Keith R.
5fb4e7f7-2f7e-4e6e-a045-6d7690626695
Nie, Mengyan
a8613738-d74a-40fb-8881-08069fb0a34b
Wharton, J.A.
965a38fd-d2bc-4a19-a08c-2d4e036aa96b
Cranny, Andy
2ebc2ccb-7d3e-4a6a-91ac-9f089741939e
Harris, N.R.
237cfdbd-86e4-4025-869c-c85136f14dfd
Wood, Robert J.K.
d9523d31-41a8-459a-8831-70e29ffe8a73
Stokes, Keith R.
5fb4e7f7-2f7e-4e6e-a045-6d7690626695

Nie, Mengyan, Wharton, J.A., Cranny, Andy, Harris, N.R., Wood, Robert J.K. and Stokes, Keith R. (2013) Characterisation of crevice and pit solution chemistries using capillary electrophoresis with contactless conductivity detector. [in special issue: Corrosion Monitoring and Control] Materials, 6 (10), 4345-4360. (doi:10.3390/ma6104345).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The ability to predict structural degradation in-service is often limited by a lack of understanding of the evolving chemical species occurring within a range of different microenvironments associated with corrosion sites. Capillary electrophoresis (CE) is capable of analysing nanolitre solution volumes with widely disparate concentrations of ionic species, thereby producing accurate and reliable results for the analysis of the chemical compositions found within microenvironment corrosion solutions, such as those found at crevice and pit corrosion sites. In this study, CE with contactless conductivity detection (CCD) has been used to characterize pitting and crevice corrosion solution chemistries for the first time. By using the capillary electrophoresis with contactless conductivity detection (CE-CCD) system, direct and simultaneous detection of seven metal cations (Cu2+, Ni2+, Fe3+, Fe2+, Cr3+, Mn2+, and Al3+) and chloride anions was achieved with a buffer solution of 10 mM 2,6-pyridinedicarboxylic acid and 0.5 mM cetyltrimethylammonium hydroxide at pH 4 using a pre-column complexation method. The detection limits obtained for the metal cations and chloride anions were 100 and 10 ppb, respectively. The CE-CCD methodology has been demonstrated to be a versatile technique capable of speciation and quantifying the ionic species generated within artificial pit (a pencil electrode) and crevice corrosion geometries for carbon steels and nickel-aluminium bronze, thus allowing the evolution of the solution chemistry to be assessed with time and the identification of the key corrosion analyte targets for structural health monitoring

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Accepted/In Press date: 23 September 2013
Published date: 30 September 2013
Keywords: structural health monitoring, corrosion solution chemistries, corrosion monitoring, capillary electrophoresis, contactless conductivity detection
Organisations: Electronics & Computer Science, nCATS Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 358079
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/358079
PURE UUID: 67d05467-5993-4c63-bafa-eafebf84878c
ORCID for Mengyan Nie: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7758-760X
ORCID for J.A. Wharton: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3439-017X
ORCID for N.R. Harris: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4122-2219
ORCID for Robert J.K. Wood: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0681-9239

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Date deposited: 04 Oct 2013 13:35
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 16:50

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