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The science of implantation emerges blinking into the light

The science of implantation emerges blinking into the light
The science of implantation emerges blinking into the light
Although embryo implantation is essential for human survival, it remains an enigmatic biological phenomenon. Following fertilization, the resulting blastocyst must signal its presence to the mother, attach to the luminal epithelium of the endometrium and embed into the decidualising stroma. Failure to do so results in infertility, which affects around 9% of women. Subsequent placental development requires remodelling of maternal blood vessels by trophoblast cells from the placenta, that invade deep into the decidua. Failure in these very early stages can compromise fetal development, resulting in diseases of pregnancy such as intrauterine growth restriction or pre-eclampsia which can also impact on health in adulthood. Abnormal implantation therefore constitutes a significant disease burden in humans. Although we have known for many years that successful implantation requires an embryo that is competent to implant and an endometrium that is receptive, the molecular basis of these processes remains poorly understood. Our inability to identify implantation-competent embryos or to diagnose/treat the non-receptive endometrium therefore limits our ability to intervene through assisted reproduction techniques. This Implantation Symposium aims to review recent exciting developments in our understanding of the biology of early implantation and to highlight the rapid progress being made to translate these into improved diagnosis and treatment. Although embryo implantation is essential for human survival, it remains an enigmatic biological phenomenon. Following fertilization, the resulting blastocyst must signal its presence to the mother, attach to the luminal epithelium of the endometrium and embed into the decidualising stroma. Failure to do so results in infertility, which affects around 9% of women. Subsequent placental development requires remodelling of maternal blood vessels by trophoblast cells that invade deep into the decidua. Failure in these very early stages can compromise fetal development, resulting in diseases of pregnancy such as intrauterine growth restriction or pre-eclampsia which can also impact on health in adulthood. Abnormal implantation therefore constitutes a significant disease burden in humans. Although we have known for many years that successful implantation requires an embryo that is competent to implant and an endometrium that is receptive, the molecular basis of these processes remains poorly understood. Our inability to identify implantation-competent embryos or to diagnose/treat the non-receptive endometrium therefore limits our ability to intervene through assisted reproduction techniques. This Implantation Symposium aims to review recent exciting developments in our understanding of the biology of early implantation and to highlight the rapid progress being made to translate these into improved diagnosis and treatment.
embryo, endometrium, implantation, infertility, receptivity
1472-6483
Sharkey, Andrew M.
faaec2ac-0cdd-4dd2-ba76-0914bbc7d833
Macklon, Nick S.
7db1f4fc-a9f6-431f-a1f2-297bb8c9fb7e
Sharkey, Andrew M.
faaec2ac-0cdd-4dd2-ba76-0914bbc7d833
Macklon, Nick S.
7db1f4fc-a9f6-431f-a1f2-297bb8c9fb7e

Sharkey, Andrew M. and Macklon, Nick S. (2013) The science of implantation emerges blinking into the light. Reproductive BioMedicine Online. (doi:10.1016/j.rbmo.2013.08.005). (PMID:24055396)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Although embryo implantation is essential for human survival, it remains an enigmatic biological phenomenon. Following fertilization, the resulting blastocyst must signal its presence to the mother, attach to the luminal epithelium of the endometrium and embed into the decidualising stroma. Failure to do so results in infertility, which affects around 9% of women. Subsequent placental development requires remodelling of maternal blood vessels by trophoblast cells from the placenta, that invade deep into the decidua. Failure in these very early stages can compromise fetal development, resulting in diseases of pregnancy such as intrauterine growth restriction or pre-eclampsia which can also impact on health in adulthood. Abnormal implantation therefore constitutes a significant disease burden in humans. Although we have known for many years that successful implantation requires an embryo that is competent to implant and an endometrium that is receptive, the molecular basis of these processes remains poorly understood. Our inability to identify implantation-competent embryos or to diagnose/treat the non-receptive endometrium therefore limits our ability to intervene through assisted reproduction techniques. This Implantation Symposium aims to review recent exciting developments in our understanding of the biology of early implantation and to highlight the rapid progress being made to translate these into improved diagnosis and treatment. Although embryo implantation is essential for human survival, it remains an enigmatic biological phenomenon. Following fertilization, the resulting blastocyst must signal its presence to the mother, attach to the luminal epithelium of the endometrium and embed into the decidualising stroma. Failure to do so results in infertility, which affects around 9% of women. Subsequent placental development requires remodelling of maternal blood vessels by trophoblast cells that invade deep into the decidua. Failure in these very early stages can compromise fetal development, resulting in diseases of pregnancy such as intrauterine growth restriction or pre-eclampsia which can also impact on health in adulthood. Abnormal implantation therefore constitutes a significant disease burden in humans. Although we have known for many years that successful implantation requires an embryo that is competent to implant and an endometrium that is receptive, the molecular basis of these processes remains poorly understood. Our inability to identify implantation-competent embryos or to diagnose/treat the non-receptive endometrium therefore limits our ability to intervene through assisted reproduction techniques. This Implantation Symposium aims to review recent exciting developments in our understanding of the biology of early implantation and to highlight the rapid progress being made to translate these into improved diagnosis and treatment.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 3 September 2013
e-pub ahead of print date: 3 September 2013
Keywords: embryo, endometrium, implantation, infertility, receptivity
Organisations: Human Development & Health

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 358202
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/358202
ISSN: 1472-6483
PURE UUID: 41f9d7ae-f1d8-408b-a770-397261f298cf

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Date deposited: 09 Oct 2013 11:09
Last modified: 22 Jul 2022 18:46

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Contributors

Author: Andrew M. Sharkey
Author: Nick S. Macklon

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