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Interannual variability in the global uptake of CO2

Interannual variability in the global uptake of CO2
Interannual variability in the global uptake of CO2
A major uncertainty are the causes for interannual variability of the global ocean uptake of CO2. Existing estimates, based on atmospheric CO2 data, indicate that peak-to-peak interannual variability in ocean uptake of CO2 is up to 2–4 Pg C year?1 (Pg = 1015 g), while those estimates based on ocean observations and models suggest that year-to-year variability is much smaller (?0.4–0.8 Pg C year?1). Here, it is shown that these differences can be partly reconciled if global air-sea CO2 flux estimates include the CO2 flux associated with tropical cyclones (TC), extra-tropical cyclones (ETC), and new air-sea CO2 gas exchange relationships. The impact of storm events on air-sea CO2 flux is influenced by climate variability such as the El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), contributing to an interannual peak-to-peak variability in global ocean uptake of CO2 of up to ?1.8 Pg C year?1.
0094-8276
1059-1064
Bates, Nicholas R.
954a83d6-8424-49e9-8acd-e606221c9c57
Bates, Nicholas R.
954a83d6-8424-49e9-8acd-e606221c9c57

Bates, Nicholas R. (2002) Interannual variability in the global uptake of CO2. Geophysical Research Letters, 29 (5), 1059-1064. (doi:10.1029/2001GL013571).

Record type: Article

Abstract

A major uncertainty are the causes for interannual variability of the global ocean uptake of CO2. Existing estimates, based on atmospheric CO2 data, indicate that peak-to-peak interannual variability in ocean uptake of CO2 is up to 2–4 Pg C year?1 (Pg = 1015 g), while those estimates based on ocean observations and models suggest that year-to-year variability is much smaller (?0.4–0.8 Pg C year?1). Here, it is shown that these differences can be partly reconciled if global air-sea CO2 flux estimates include the CO2 flux associated with tropical cyclones (TC), extra-tropical cyclones (ETC), and new air-sea CO2 gas exchange relationships. The impact of storm events on air-sea CO2 flux is influenced by climate variability such as the El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), contributing to an interannual peak-to-peak variability in global ocean uptake of CO2 of up to ?1.8 Pg C year?1.

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Published date: March 2002
Organisations: Ocean Biochemistry & Ecosystems

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 358325
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/358325
ISSN: 0094-8276
PURE UUID: 9a55139e-dd18-43e5-950b-28da4d99723e

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Date deposited: 03 Oct 2013 13:01
Last modified: 16 Jul 2019 21:21

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