The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Mental health and homelessness: the role of self control

Mental health and homelessness: the role of self control
Mental health and homelessness: the role of self control
Maladaptive functioning is commonly associated with poor self-control; however being overly controlled can be equally disadvantageous. One area of research that considers this distinction is the person-centred typological approach to personality based on a pioneering classification system developed by Block & Block (1980). This systematic review draws together research, in adult populations, that considers the utility of personality types based upon this conceptualisation. Three personality types have been largely replicated in both normal and clinical populations: resilients, overcontrollers and undercontrollers. These types show utility in predicting long-term functioning and mental health, understanding heterogeneous personalities within clinical subgroups, and have implications for treatment. Some disagreement on the number of personality types deemed replicable across samples and differing methodologies does exist, and some find a dimensional approach to personality to have greater predictive utility. A typological approach does however have clinical utility over dimensional-approaches in aiding communication and planning intervention. Limitations of the literature are discussed, and future directions considered.
Numerous population groups have not been considered in terms of their personality heterogeneity. On this basis, the empirical paper explored the personality characteristics of a sample of 91 homeless men and women. It was hypothesised that within this population both overcontrolled and undercontrolled personality styles would exist, which would be differentially associated with maladaptive behaviours known to contribute to tenancy breakdown. By use of self-report measures, the sample was shown to be more undercontrolled than overcontrolled. Undercontrol was significantly associated with a range of maladaptive behaviours; however overcontrol did not show the expected relationship with restrictive behaviours. Mediation analysis, using a bootstrap analysis, found self-control to mediate the relationship between impulsivity traits related to positive affect, and maladaptive behaviours. The clinical implications resulting from these findings are discussed.
Bohane, Laura
6ab83eeb-99a4-4c20-9c8d-38384d29374b
Bohane, Laura
6ab83eeb-99a4-4c20-9c8d-38384d29374b
Maguire, Nicholas
ebc88e0a-3c1e-4b3a-88ac-e1dad740011b

Bohane, Laura (2013) Mental health and homelessness: the role of self control. University of Southampton, Psychology, Doctoral Thesis, 208pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

Maladaptive functioning is commonly associated with poor self-control; however being overly controlled can be equally disadvantageous. One area of research that considers this distinction is the person-centred typological approach to personality based on a pioneering classification system developed by Block & Block (1980). This systematic review draws together research, in adult populations, that considers the utility of personality types based upon this conceptualisation. Three personality types have been largely replicated in both normal and clinical populations: resilients, overcontrollers and undercontrollers. These types show utility in predicting long-term functioning and mental health, understanding heterogeneous personalities within clinical subgroups, and have implications for treatment. Some disagreement on the number of personality types deemed replicable across samples and differing methodologies does exist, and some find a dimensional approach to personality to have greater predictive utility. A typological approach does however have clinical utility over dimensional-approaches in aiding communication and planning intervention. Limitations of the literature are discussed, and future directions considered.
Numerous population groups have not been considered in terms of their personality heterogeneity. On this basis, the empirical paper explored the personality characteristics of a sample of 91 homeless men and women. It was hypothesised that within this population both overcontrolled and undercontrolled personality styles would exist, which would be differentially associated with maladaptive behaviours known to contribute to tenancy breakdown. By use of self-report measures, the sample was shown to be more undercontrolled than overcontrolled. Undercontrol was significantly associated with a range of maladaptive behaviours; however overcontrol did not show the expected relationship with restrictive behaviours. Mediation analysis, using a bootstrap analysis, found self-control to mediate the relationship between impulsivity traits related to positive affect, and maladaptive behaviours. The clinical implications resulting from these findings are discussed.

PDF
DClinPsyc THESIS - Laura Bohane.pdf - Other
Download (2MB)

More information

Published date: May 2013
Organisations: University of Southampton, Psychology

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 358510
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/358510
PURE UUID: cd73d552-cb45-4ce5-a8fe-bb930d85b0e5
ORCID for Nicholas Maguire: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4295-8068

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 10 Dec 2013 11:25
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 12:51

Export record

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×