The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Changing the behaviour of healthcare professionals using theory based, computer-delivered interventions

Changing the behaviour of healthcare professionals using theory based, computer-delivered interventions
Changing the behaviour of healthcare professionals using theory based, computer-delivered interventions
Non-adherence to clinical guidelines has been identified as a consistent finding in general practice. The purpose of this research was to develop and evaluate theory-informed, computer-delivered interventions to promote the implementation of guidelines in general practice, which GPs viewed as feasible and acceptable. The intervention aimed to promote guideline adherence for antibiotic prescribing in respiratory tract infections, and adherence to recommendations for secondary stroke prevention. An intervention development study involved the creation of computer-delivered prompts using aspects of social cognitive theory, and drawing on nationally recommended standards for clinical content. Prompts were presented to GPs during interviews, and iteratively refined based on feedback. GPs reported being more likely to use prompts if they were perceived as offering support and choice, as opposed to being an enforcement method. The prompts were then entered into a trial (not reported) and two process evaluation studies were conducted with GPs who had taken part in the trial. A qualitative evaluation study involving interviews with GPs, revealed that the prompts were perceived as useful and acceptable in practice, but GPs who had not been informed of the prompts appearance reported being less likely to engage with them. A quantitative evaluation study involved a questionnaire consisting of theory based measures and an intervention evaluation measure. GPs were satisfied with the usability of the prompts, and intervention group GPs reported higher levels of self-efficacy in managing patients according to guidelines compared to control group GPs. Overall the intervention was viewed as feasible and acceptable. A key characteristic of an acceptable computer-delivered intervention appears to be that it should be perceived as a useful tool supporting GP practice. However, conclusions of the evaluation were limited by a small and potentially non-representative sample of trial GPs.
McDermott, Lisa
5e895229-decd-4a30-8d08-dd9cc5b8f443
McDermott, Lisa
5e895229-decd-4a30-8d08-dd9cc5b8f443
Yardley, Lucy
64be42c4-511d-484d-abaa-f8813452a22e

(2013) Changing the behaviour of healthcare professionals using theory based, computer-delivered interventions. University of Southampton, Psychology, Doctoral Thesis, 356pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

Non-adherence to clinical guidelines has been identified as a consistent finding in general practice. The purpose of this research was to develop and evaluate theory-informed, computer-delivered interventions to promote the implementation of guidelines in general practice, which GPs viewed as feasible and acceptable. The intervention aimed to promote guideline adherence for antibiotic prescribing in respiratory tract infections, and adherence to recommendations for secondary stroke prevention. An intervention development study involved the creation of computer-delivered prompts using aspects of social cognitive theory, and drawing on nationally recommended standards for clinical content. Prompts were presented to GPs during interviews, and iteratively refined based on feedback. GPs reported being more likely to use prompts if they were perceived as offering support and choice, as opposed to being an enforcement method. The prompts were then entered into a trial (not reported) and two process evaluation studies were conducted with GPs who had taken part in the trial. A qualitative evaluation study involving interviews with GPs, revealed that the prompts were perceived as useful and acceptable in practice, but GPs who had not been informed of the prompts appearance reported being less likely to engage with them. A quantitative evaluation study involved a questionnaire consisting of theory based measures and an intervention evaluation measure. GPs were satisfied with the usability of the prompts, and intervention group GPs reported higher levels of self-efficacy in managing patients according to guidelines compared to control group GPs. Overall the intervention was viewed as feasible and acceptable. A key characteristic of an acceptable computer-delivered intervention appears to be that it should be perceived as a useful tool supporting GP practice. However, conclusions of the evaluation were limited by a small and potentially non-representative sample of trial GPs.

PDF
Lisa McD FINAL CORRECTED THESIS JUNE2013.pdf - Other
Download (6MB)

More information

Published date: February 2013
Organisations: University of Southampton, Psychology

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 358526
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/358526
PURE UUID: b911e832-3076-482b-b876-03012c381e04
ORCID for Lucy Yardley: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3853-883X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 10 Dec 2013 11:35
Last modified: 19 Jun 2019 00:37

Export record

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×