The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Deep-sea hydrothermal vent animals seek cool fluids in a highly variable thermal environment

Deep-sea hydrothermal vent animals seek cool fluids in a highly variable thermal environment
Deep-sea hydrothermal vent animals seek cool fluids in a highly variable thermal environment
The thermal characteristics of an organism's environment affect a multitude of parameters, from biochemical to evolutionary processes. Hydrothermal vents on mid-ocean ridges are created when warm hydrothermal fluids are ejected from the seafloor and mixed with cold bottom seawater; many animals thrive along these steep temperature and chemical gradients. Two-dimensional temperature maps at vent sites have demonstrated order of magnitude thermal changes over centimetre distances and at time intervals from minutes to hours. To investigate whether animals adapt to this extreme level of environmental variability, we examined differences in the thermal behaviour of mobile invertebrates from aquatic habitats that vary in thermal regime. Vent animals were highly responsive to heat and preferred much cooler fluids than their upper thermal limits, whereas invertebrates from other aquatic environments risked exposure to warmer temperatures. Avoidance of temperatures well within their tolerated range may allow vent animals to maintain a safety margin against rapid temperature fluctuations and concomitant toxicity of hydrothermal fluids.
1-6
Bates, Amanda E.
a96e267d-6d22-4232-b7ed-ce4e448a2a34
Lee, Raymond W
0c86be9c-4c8a-4518-93fc-b4eb36cafd06
Tunnicliffe, Verena
905c2d00-3c61-46e0-91f5-0ab7f7ab0992
Lamare, Miles D
d895293e-21b8-4ff0-a919-3386c96a3bad
Bates, Amanda E.
a96e267d-6d22-4232-b7ed-ce4e448a2a34
Lee, Raymond W
0c86be9c-4c8a-4518-93fc-b4eb36cafd06
Tunnicliffe, Verena
905c2d00-3c61-46e0-91f5-0ab7f7ab0992
Lamare, Miles D
d895293e-21b8-4ff0-a919-3386c96a3bad

Bates, Amanda E., Lee, Raymond W, Tunnicliffe, Verena and Lamare, Miles D (2010) Deep-sea hydrothermal vent animals seek cool fluids in a highly variable thermal environment. Nature Communications, 1 (2), 1-6. (doi:10.1038/ncomms1014).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The thermal characteristics of an organism's environment affect a multitude of parameters, from biochemical to evolutionary processes. Hydrothermal vents on mid-ocean ridges are created when warm hydrothermal fluids are ejected from the seafloor and mixed with cold bottom seawater; many animals thrive along these steep temperature and chemical gradients. Two-dimensional temperature maps at vent sites have demonstrated order of magnitude thermal changes over centimetre distances and at time intervals from minutes to hours. To investigate whether animals adapt to this extreme level of environmental variability, we examined differences in the thermal behaviour of mobile invertebrates from aquatic habitats that vary in thermal regime. Vent animals were highly responsive to heat and preferred much cooler fluids than their upper thermal limits, whereas invertebrates from other aquatic environments risked exposure to warmer temperatures. Avoidance of temperatures well within their tolerated range may allow vent animals to maintain a safety margin against rapid temperature fluctuations and concomitant toxicity of hydrothermal fluids.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 4 May 2010
Organisations: Ocean and Earth Science

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 358567
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/358567
PURE UUID: 9f2803d6-c486-4d75-9240-45a94fcb6904

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 08 Oct 2013 14:15
Last modified: 16 Jul 2019 21:20

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×