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Ecological and evolutionary consequences of size-selective harvesting: how much do we know?

Ecological and evolutionary consequences of size-selective harvesting: how much do we know?
Ecological and evolutionary consequences of size-selective harvesting: how much do we know?
Size-selective harvesting, where the large individuals of a particular species are preferentially taken, is common in both marine and terrestrial habitats. Preferential removal of larger individuals of a species has been shown to have a negative effect on its demography, life history and ecology, and empirical studies are increasingly documenting such impacts. But determining whether the observed changes represent evolutionary response or phenotypic plasticity remains a challenge. In addition, the problem is not recognized in most management plans for fish and marine invertebrates that still mandate a minimum size restriction. We use examples from both aquatic and terrestrial habitats to illustrate some of the biological consequences of size-selective harvesting and discuss possible future directions of research as well as changes in management policy needed to mitigate its negative biological impacts.
fishery, invertebrates, macroevolution, microevolution, size-selective harvesting, terrestrial vertebrates
0962-1083
209-220
Fenberg, Phillip B.
c73918cd-98cc-41e6-a18c-bf0de4f1ace8
Roy, Kaustuv
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Fenberg, Phillip B.
c73918cd-98cc-41e6-a18c-bf0de4f1ace8
Roy, Kaustuv
a1a9a581-0508-4340-9065-a1cbc5a9a04e

Fenberg, Phillip B. and Roy, Kaustuv (2008) Ecological and evolutionary consequences of size-selective harvesting: how much do we know? Molecular Ecology, 17 (1), 209-220. (doi:10.1111/j.1365-294X.2007.03522.x).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Size-selective harvesting, where the large individuals of a particular species are preferentially taken, is common in both marine and terrestrial habitats. Preferential removal of larger individuals of a species has been shown to have a negative effect on its demography, life history and ecology, and empirical studies are increasingly documenting such impacts. But determining whether the observed changes represent evolutionary response or phenotypic plasticity remains a challenge. In addition, the problem is not recognized in most management plans for fish and marine invertebrates that still mandate a minimum size restriction. We use examples from both aquatic and terrestrial habitats to illustrate some of the biological consequences of size-selective harvesting and discuss possible future directions of research as well as changes in management policy needed to mitigate its negative biological impacts.

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Published date: January 2008
Keywords: fishery, invertebrates, macroevolution, microevolution, size-selective harvesting, terrestrial vertebrates
Organisations: Ocean and Earth Science

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Local EPrints ID: 358586
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/358586
ISSN: 0962-1083
PURE UUID: 07b8cf16-988a-4f78-9908-c56aeff4b073

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Date deposited: 08 Oct 2013 16:07
Last modified: 16 Dec 2019 20:29

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Author: Kaustuv Roy

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