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I feel good, therefore I am real: testing the causal influence of mood on state authenticity

I feel good, therefore I am real: testing the causal influence of mood on state authenticity
I feel good, therefore I am real: testing the causal influence of mood on state authenticity
Although the literature has focused on individual differences in authenticity, recent findings suggest that authenticity is sensitive to context; that is, it is also a state. We extended this perspective by examining whether incidental affect influences authenticity. In three experiments, participants felt more authentic when in a relatively positive than negative mood. The causal role of affect in authenticity was consistent across a diverse set of mood inductions, including explicit (Experiments 1 and 3) and implicit (Experiment 2) methods. The link between incidental affect and state authenticity was not moderated by ability to down-regulate negative affect (Experiments 1 and 3) nor was it explained by negative mood increasing private self-consciousness or decreasing access to the self system (Experiment 3). The results indicate that mood is used as information to assess one's sense of authenticity.
authenticity, self, mood, personality systems interaction theory, affect infusion model, mood as information
0269-9931
1202-1224
Lenton, Alison P.
c5cf4e47-999c-4636-8728-17faeca0c1ef
Slabu, Letitia
703c9491-2f8f-4812-8d92-5f67c7a4084f
Sedikides, Constantine
9d45e66d-75bb-44de-87d7-21fd553812c2
Power, Katherine
bf2310ec-17d7-4ebe-aa40-26385a996d69
Lenton, Alison P.
c5cf4e47-999c-4636-8728-17faeca0c1ef
Slabu, Letitia
703c9491-2f8f-4812-8d92-5f67c7a4084f
Sedikides, Constantine
9d45e66d-75bb-44de-87d7-21fd553812c2
Power, Katherine
bf2310ec-17d7-4ebe-aa40-26385a996d69

Lenton, Alison P., Slabu, Letitia, Sedikides, Constantine and Power, Katherine (2013) I feel good, therefore I am real: testing the causal influence of mood on state authenticity Cognition and Emotion, 27, (7), pp. 1202-1224. (PMID:23574266).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Although the literature has focused on individual differences in authenticity, recent findings suggest that authenticity is sensitive to context; that is, it is also a state. We extended this perspective by examining whether incidental affect influences authenticity. In three experiments, participants felt more authentic when in a relatively positive than negative mood. The causal role of affect in authenticity was consistent across a diverse set of mood inductions, including explicit (Experiments 1 and 3) and implicit (Experiment 2) methods. The link between incidental affect and state authenticity was not moderated by ability to down-regulate negative affect (Experiments 1 and 3) nor was it explained by negative mood increasing private self-consciousness or decreasing access to the self system (Experiment 3). The results indicate that mood is used as information to assess one's sense of authenticity.

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e-pub ahead of print date: 10 April 2013
Published date: 2013
Keywords: authenticity, self, mood, personality systems interaction theory, affect infusion model, mood as information

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 358786
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/358786
ISSN: 0269-9931
PURE UUID: f6119919-509c-4c21-9dd2-a82053c2e66a

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Date deposited: 15 Oct 2013 10:38
Last modified: 30 Aug 2017 04:41

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Contributors

Author: Alison P. Lenton
Author: Letitia Slabu
Author: Katherine Power

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