The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Discrete-event simulation is alive and kicking

Discrete-event simulation is alive and kicking
Discrete-event simulation is alive and kicking
At the 2010 OR Society Simulation Workshop, there was a lively panel discussion entitled ‘Discrete-event simulation is dead, long live agent-based simulation!’, which was subsequently written up as a position paper for the Journal of Simulation (Siebers et al, 2010). This paper continues that discussion and, to quote Mark Twain, argues that rumours of the death of discrete-event simulation (DES) are greatly exaggerated. There has undoubtedly been a recent surge of interest within the mainstream OR community in the use of agent-based modelling, but this paper suggests that many of the cited benefits of agent-based simulation (ABS) can be achieved through the use of a traditional DES approach. These arguments are illustrated by several examples where DES has been used successfully to tackle ‘ABS-type’ problems.
1747-7778
Brailsford, S.C.
634585ff-c828-46ca-b33d-7ac017dda04f
Brailsford, S.C.
634585ff-c828-46ca-b33d-7ac017dda04f

Brailsford, S.C. (2013) Discrete-event simulation is alive and kicking. Journal of Simulation. (doi:10.1057/jos.2013.13).

Record type: Article

Abstract

At the 2010 OR Society Simulation Workshop, there was a lively panel discussion entitled ‘Discrete-event simulation is dead, long live agent-based simulation!’, which was subsequently written up as a position paper for the Journal of Simulation (Siebers et al, 2010). This paper continues that discussion and, to quote Mark Twain, argues that rumours of the death of discrete-event simulation (DES) are greatly exaggerated. There has undoubtedly been a recent surge of interest within the mainstream OR community in the use of agent-based modelling, but this paper suggests that many of the cited benefits of agent-based simulation (ABS) can be achieved through the use of a traditional DES approach. These arguments are illustrated by several examples where DES has been used successfully to tackle ‘ABS-type’ problems.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 9 August 2013
Organisations: Centre of Excellence for International Banking, Finance & Accounting

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 358861
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/358861
ISSN: 1747-7778
PURE UUID: 3701d8b3-b2ed-449c-b244-593ea272dcf4
ORCID for S.C. Brailsford: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6665-8230

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 14 Oct 2013 13:51
Last modified: 15 Aug 2019 00:56

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×