The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Behavior of an MBT waste in monotonic triaxial shear tests

Behavior of an MBT waste in monotonic triaxial shear tests
Behavior of an MBT waste in monotonic triaxial shear tests
Legislation in some parts of the world now requires municipal solid waste (MSW) to be processed prior to landfilling to reduce its biodegradability and hence its polluting potential through leachate and fugitive emission of greenhouse gases. This pre-processing may be achieved through what is generically termed mechanical–biological-treatment (MBT). One of the major concerns relating to MBT wastes is that the strength of the material may be less than for raw MSW, owing to the removal of sheet, stick and string-like reinforcing elements during processing. Also, the gradual increase in mobilized strength over strains of 30% or so commonly associated with unprocessed municipal solid waste may not occur with treated wastes. This paper describes a series of triaxial tests carried out to investigate the stress–strain–strength characteristics of an MBT waste, using a novel digital image analysis technique for the determination of detailed displacement fields over the whole specimen. New insights gained into the mechanical behavior of MBT waste include the effect of density on the stress–strain response, the initial 1-D compression of lightly consolidated specimens, and the likely reinforcing effect of small sheet like particles remaining in the waste
density, compressibility, sher strength, digital image correlation, municipal solid waste, mbt
0956-053X
881-891
Bhandari, A.R.
8024e53e-5172-424f-8e73-07de47165c62
Powrie, W.
600c3f02-00f8-4486-ae4b-b4fc8ec77c3c
Bhandari, A.R.
8024e53e-5172-424f-8e73-07de47165c62
Powrie, W.
600c3f02-00f8-4486-ae4b-b4fc8ec77c3c

Bhandari, A.R. and Powrie, W. (2013) Behavior of an MBT waste in monotonic triaxial shear tests. Waste Management, 33 (4), 881-891. (doi:10.1016/j.wasman.2012.11.009).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Legislation in some parts of the world now requires municipal solid waste (MSW) to be processed prior to landfilling to reduce its biodegradability and hence its polluting potential through leachate and fugitive emission of greenhouse gases. This pre-processing may be achieved through what is generically termed mechanical–biological-treatment (MBT). One of the major concerns relating to MBT wastes is that the strength of the material may be less than for raw MSW, owing to the removal of sheet, stick and string-like reinforcing elements during processing. Also, the gradual increase in mobilized strength over strains of 30% or so commonly associated with unprocessed municipal solid waste may not occur with treated wastes. This paper describes a series of triaxial tests carried out to investigate the stress–strain–strength characteristics of an MBT waste, using a novel digital image analysis technique for the determination of detailed displacement fields over the whole specimen. New insights gained into the mechanical behavior of MBT waste include the effect of density on the stress–strain response, the initial 1-D compression of lightly consolidated specimens, and the likely reinforcing effect of small sheet like particles remaining in the waste

Text
__soton.ac.uk_ude_PersonalFiles_Users_ss1q07_mydocuments_Behavior of an MBT waste in monotonic triaxial shear tests (2).pdf - Other
Restricted to Repository staff only
Request a copy

More information

Published date: April 2013
Keywords: density, compressibility, sher strength, digital image correlation, municipal solid waste, mbt
Organisations: Infrastructure Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 358902
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/358902
ISSN: 0956-053X
PURE UUID: ac5f9649-6f1a-4dbe-9ded-2fd791c8d585
ORCID for W. Powrie: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2271-0826

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 15 Oct 2013 10:13
Last modified: 20 Jul 2019 01:19

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×