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Towards incorporating human behaviour in models of health care systems: an approach using discrete event simulation

Towards incorporating human behaviour in models of health care systems: an approach using discrete event simulation
Towards incorporating human behaviour in models of health care systems: an approach using discrete event simulation
Operational Research models are well established as an effective tool for tackling a vast range of health care problems. Many of these models involve parameters which depend on human behaviour, and thus individuals’ characteristics or personality traits should be included. In this paper we describe a discrete event simulation model of attendance for screening for diabetic retinopathy, a sight-threatening complication of diabetes. This model takes into account the physical states, emotions, cognitions and social status of the persons involved. The model also uses some ideas from the discipline of health psychology. We believe that this approach provides what is potentially a far more accurate method of modelling patients’ attendance behaviour, compared with the standard approach of simple random sampling of patients. However, further empirical work is required, firstly to derive and validate more realistic forms of the model equations, secondly to select the appropriate psychological variables, and thirdly and inevitably to collect data.
health-related behaviour, modelling, agent-based simulation, screening
0377-2217
19-31
Brailsford, Sally
634585ff-c828-46ca-b33d-7ac017dda04f
Schmidt, Bernd
834302ea-e058-42d4-a099-420ab1a2d353
Brailsford, Sally
634585ff-c828-46ca-b33d-7ac017dda04f
Schmidt, Bernd
834302ea-e058-42d4-a099-420ab1a2d353

Brailsford, Sally and Schmidt, Bernd (2003) Towards incorporating human behaviour in models of health care systems: an approach using discrete event simulation. European Journal of Operational Research, 150 (1), 19-31. (doi:10.1016/S0377-2217(02)00778-6).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Operational Research models are well established as an effective tool for tackling a vast range of health care problems. Many of these models involve parameters which depend on human behaviour, and thus individuals’ characteristics or personality traits should be included. In this paper we describe a discrete event simulation model of attendance for screening for diabetic retinopathy, a sight-threatening complication of diabetes. This model takes into account the physical states, emotions, cognitions and social status of the persons involved. The model also uses some ideas from the discipline of health psychology. We believe that this approach provides what is potentially a far more accurate method of modelling patients’ attendance behaviour, compared with the standard approach of simple random sampling of patients. However, further empirical work is required, firstly to derive and validate more realistic forms of the model equations, secondly to select the appropriate psychological variables, and thirdly and inevitably to collect data.

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More information

Published date: 2003
Keywords: health-related behaviour, modelling, agent-based simulation, screening

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 35901
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/35901
ISSN: 0377-2217
PURE UUID: 4c582112-6a00-45bc-a197-e259973fca33
ORCID for Sally Brailsford: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6665-8230

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 23 May 2006
Last modified: 31 Jul 2019 00:53

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