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Geographical range, heat tolerance and invasion success in aquatic species

Geographical range, heat tolerance and invasion success in aquatic species
Geographical range, heat tolerance and invasion success in aquatic species
Species with broader geographical ranges are expected to be ecological generalists, while species with higher heat tolerances may be relatively competitive at more extreme and increasing temperatures. Thus, both traits are expected to relate to increased survival during transport to new regions of the globe, and once there, establishment and spread. Here, we explore these expectations using datasets of latitudinal range breadth and heat tolerance in freshwater and marine invertebrates and fishes. After accounting for the latitude and hemisphere of each species’ native range, we find that species introduced to freshwater systems have broader geographical ranges in comparison to native species. Moreover, introduced species are more heat tolerant than related native species collected from the same habitats. We further test for differences in range breadth and heat tolerance in relation to invasion success by comparing species that have established geographically restricted versus extensive introduced distributions. We find that geographical range size is positively related to invasion success in freshwater species only. However, heat tolerance is implicated as a trait correlated to widespread occurrence of introduced populations in both freshwater and marine systems. Our results emphasize the importance of formal risk assessments before moving heat tolerant species to novel locations.
macroecology, invasion risk assessment, biogeography, species traits, equatorward range boundary, thermal physiology
0962-8452
20131958
Bates, A.E.
a96e267d-6d22-4232-b7ed-ce4e448a2a34
McKelvie, C.M.
e39af55d-4a86-4483-a000-91342cd76b72
Sorte, C.J.B.
af39934d-71cb-4264-8ee5-598ce9bfa634
Morley, S.A.
25f2fd19-d29e-48b9-a8d3-06c521bd2411
Jones, N.A.R.
a8ae9b0a-9bde-4808-a7d6-74ca926d77c4
Mondon, J.A.
9909bc5e-9639-42dc-be8b-3ab147b62b2b
Bird, T.J.
fc9f5326-02c4-44a6-805a-134b32d3ea0c
Quinn, G.
7e6379c8-c586-4b1c-9de7-dcc4e87da167
Bates, A.E.
a96e267d-6d22-4232-b7ed-ce4e448a2a34
McKelvie, C.M.
e39af55d-4a86-4483-a000-91342cd76b72
Sorte, C.J.B.
af39934d-71cb-4264-8ee5-598ce9bfa634
Morley, S.A.
25f2fd19-d29e-48b9-a8d3-06c521bd2411
Jones, N.A.R.
a8ae9b0a-9bde-4808-a7d6-74ca926d77c4
Mondon, J.A.
9909bc5e-9639-42dc-be8b-3ab147b62b2b
Bird, T.J.
fc9f5326-02c4-44a6-805a-134b32d3ea0c
Quinn, G.
7e6379c8-c586-4b1c-9de7-dcc4e87da167

Bates, A.E., McKelvie, C.M., Sorte, C.J.B., Morley, S.A., Jones, N.A.R., Mondon, J.A., Bird, T.J. and Quinn, G. (2013) Geographical range, heat tolerance and invasion success in aquatic species. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 280 (1772), 20131958. (doi:10.1098/rspb.2013.1958).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Species with broader geographical ranges are expected to be ecological generalists, while species with higher heat tolerances may be relatively competitive at more extreme and increasing temperatures. Thus, both traits are expected to relate to increased survival during transport to new regions of the globe, and once there, establishment and spread. Here, we explore these expectations using datasets of latitudinal range breadth and heat tolerance in freshwater and marine invertebrates and fishes. After accounting for the latitude and hemisphere of each species’ native range, we find that species introduced to freshwater systems have broader geographical ranges in comparison to native species. Moreover, introduced species are more heat tolerant than related native species collected from the same habitats. We further test for differences in range breadth and heat tolerance in relation to invasion success by comparing species that have established geographically restricted versus extensive introduced distributions. We find that geographical range size is positively related to invasion success in freshwater species only. However, heat tolerance is implicated as a trait correlated to widespread occurrence of introduced populations in both freshwater and marine systems. Our results emphasize the importance of formal risk assessments before moving heat tolerant species to novel locations.

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More information

Published date: December 2013
Keywords: macroecology, invasion risk assessment, biogeography, species traits, equatorward range boundary, thermal physiology
Organisations: Ocean and Earth Science

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 359264
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/359264
ISSN: 0962-8452
PURE UUID: 1bb035eb-4aef-4f63-a113-f53c4c726784

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Date deposited: 24 Oct 2013 12:36
Last modified: 09 Jan 2022 05:55

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Contributors

Author: A.E. Bates
Author: C.M. McKelvie
Author: C.J.B. Sorte
Author: S.A. Morley
Author: N.A.R. Jones
Author: J.A. Mondon
Author: T.J. Bird
Author: G. Quinn

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