The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

A child's eye view of the insect world: perceptions of insect diversity

A child's eye view of the insect world: perceptions of insect diversity
A child's eye view of the insect world: perceptions of insect diversity
Insects worldwide are undergoing unprecedented rates of decline, with many species severely threatened or already extinct. Despite their extreme diversity and functional importance in ecosystems, this extinction crisis has seldom gained media attention; endangered large mammals and birds receive much greater coverage. In the UK, where the insect fauna is relatively depauperate and well known, this bias has recently been redressed by a range of initiatives that highlighted the importance of insect conservation. This study investigated the popularity of different arthropod groups drawn by children (as part of one such event), in modern culture and in the scientific literature. Children's preference for insect groups strongly correlated with their representation in modern culture and in the scientific literature. However none of the measures of popularity of each group correlated with their abundance or conservation status in the UK. The profile of lesser-known groups therefore needs to be raised to reduce the chance that threatened taxa are overlooked for conservation action.
0376-8929
Snaddon, Jake L.
31a601f7-c9b0-45e2-b59b-fda9a0c5a54b
Turner, Edgar C.
eb83e88d-a250-4c65-9b1e-0113d778fdd2
Snaddon, Jake L.
31a601f7-c9b0-45e2-b59b-fda9a0c5a54b
Turner, Edgar C.
eb83e88d-a250-4c65-9b1e-0113d778fdd2

Snaddon, Jake L. and Turner, Edgar C. (2007) A child's eye view of the insect world: perceptions of insect diversity. Environmental Conservation, 34 (1). (doi:10.1017/S0376892907003669).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Insects worldwide are undergoing unprecedented rates of decline, with many species severely threatened or already extinct. Despite their extreme diversity and functional importance in ecosystems, this extinction crisis has seldom gained media attention; endangered large mammals and birds receive much greater coverage. In the UK, where the insect fauna is relatively depauperate and well known, this bias has recently been redressed by a range of initiatives that highlighted the importance of insect conservation. This study investigated the popularity of different arthropod groups drawn by children (as part of one such event), in modern culture and in the scientific literature. Children's preference for insect groups strongly correlated with their representation in modern culture and in the scientific literature. However none of the measures of popularity of each group correlated with their abundance or conservation status in the UK. The profile of lesser-known groups therefore needs to be raised to reduce the chance that threatened taxa are overlooked for conservation action.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: March 2007
Organisations: Centre for Biological Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 359409
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/359409
ISSN: 0376-8929
PURE UUID: e5b06f34-ae02-40d2-89a8-04c6db1d2b2f
ORCID for Jake L. Snaddon: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3549-5472

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 12 Nov 2013 11:14
Last modified: 18 Jul 2017 03:21

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Jake L. Snaddon ORCID iD
Author: Edgar C. Turner

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×