The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Are trainee teachers being adequately prepared to promote the health and well-being of school children? A survey of current practice

Are trainee teachers being adequately prepared to promote the health and well-being of school children? A survey of current practice
Are trainee teachers being adequately prepared to promote the health and well-being of school children? A survey of current practice
Background: Teachers are a key part of the wider public health workforce in England. We conducted a survey to find out how they are trained for this role during their initial teacher education (ITE).

Methods: Between 2011 and 2012, we sent an online questionnaire to 220 ITE course managers and conducted semi-structured interviews with a purposive sample of 19 course managers to explore issues in more depth.

Results: The response rate to the questionnaire was 34% (n = 74). Although most of the course managers felt inclusion of health and well-being training in ITE was important, provision across courses was variable. Topics which are public health priorities [e.g. sex and relationships education (SRE) and drugs, alcohol and tobacco] were covered by fewer courses than other topics (e.g. child protection, emotional health and anti-bullying). Perceived barriers to training included lack of time and a belief that health and well-being were low priorities in educational policy.

Conclusions: Not all of tomorrow's teachers are being adequately prepared for their role in helping to address public health priorities. Educational policy does not appear to be supporting the priorities of public health policy, and this is a key barrier to health promotion training in ITE.
children, educational settings, health promotion
1741-3842
467-475
Dewhirst, Sue
1d2e5fb5-b1f3-4b30-a75d-eecb760c0a82
Pickett, Karen
1bac9d88-da29-4a3e-9fd2-e469f129f963
Speller, Viv
ebd008c7-046a-4e17-b207-8e7825b20e10
Shepherd, Jonathan
dfbca97a-9307-4eee-bdf7-e27bcb02bc67
Byrne, Jenny
135bc0f8-7c8a-42d9-bdae-5934b832c4bf
Almond, Palo
9f663186-9975-40a3-aae5-57526b27a2f6
Grace, Marcus
bb019e62-4134-4f74-9e2c-d235a6f89b97
Hartwell, Debbie
e6a0eaa0-956d-45fb-9b7d-03ca1af3334c
Roderick, Paul
dbb3cd11-4c51-4844-982b-0eb30ad5085a
Dewhirst, Sue
1d2e5fb5-b1f3-4b30-a75d-eecb760c0a82
Pickett, Karen
1bac9d88-da29-4a3e-9fd2-e469f129f963
Speller, Viv
ebd008c7-046a-4e17-b207-8e7825b20e10
Shepherd, Jonathan
dfbca97a-9307-4eee-bdf7-e27bcb02bc67
Byrne, Jenny
135bc0f8-7c8a-42d9-bdae-5934b832c4bf
Almond, Palo
9f663186-9975-40a3-aae5-57526b27a2f6
Grace, Marcus
bb019e62-4134-4f74-9e2c-d235a6f89b97
Hartwell, Debbie
e6a0eaa0-956d-45fb-9b7d-03ca1af3334c
Roderick, Paul
dbb3cd11-4c51-4844-982b-0eb30ad5085a

Dewhirst, Sue, Pickett, Karen, Speller, Viv, Shepherd, Jonathan, Byrne, Jenny, Almond, Palo, Grace, Marcus, Hartwell, Debbie and Roderick, Paul (2014) Are trainee teachers being adequately prepared to promote the health and well-being of school children? A survey of current practice. Journal of Public Health, 36 (3), 467-475. (doi:10.1093/pubmed/fdt103). (PMID:24169413)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: Teachers are a key part of the wider public health workforce in England. We conducted a survey to find out how they are trained for this role during their initial teacher education (ITE).

Methods: Between 2011 and 2012, we sent an online questionnaire to 220 ITE course managers and conducted semi-structured interviews with a purposive sample of 19 course managers to explore issues in more depth.

Results: The response rate to the questionnaire was 34% (n = 74). Although most of the course managers felt inclusion of health and well-being training in ITE was important, provision across courses was variable. Topics which are public health priorities [e.g. sex and relationships education (SRE) and drugs, alcohol and tobacco] were covered by fewer courses than other topics (e.g. child protection, emotional health and anti-bullying). Perceived barriers to training included lack of time and a belief that health and well-being were low priorities in educational policy.

Conclusions: Not all of tomorrow's teachers are being adequately prepared for their role in helping to address public health priorities. Educational policy does not appear to be supporting the priorities of public health policy, and this is a key barrier to health promotion training in ITE.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 1 September 2014
Keywords: children, educational settings, health promotion
Organisations: Faculty of Medicine, Southampton Education School, Primary Care & Population Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 359438
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/359438
ISSN: 1741-3842
PURE UUID: be7a2044-eec3-4334-a673-b9f606980e82
ORCID for Karen Pickett: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8631-6465
ORCID for Jonathan Shepherd: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1682-4330
ORCID for Jenny Byrne: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6969-5539
ORCID for Paul Roderick: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9475-6850

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 01 Nov 2013 14:52
Last modified: 15 Oct 2019 00:53

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×