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When summative computer-aided assessments go wrong: disaster recovery after a major failure

When summative computer-aided assessments go wrong: disaster recovery after a major failure
When summative computer-aided assessments go wrong: disaster recovery after a major failure
This case study outlines the events of a recent summative computer-aided assessment (CAA) failure involving 280 first-year undergraduate students. Post-test analysis found that the central server had become unexpectedly overloaded, thereby causing the CAA to be abandoned. Practical advice on just what to do in the event of a summative CAA failure is virtually non-existent in the related literature.
In response, this paper provides a detailed account of the post-failure analysis and recovery activities from a practitioner’s (ie, academic) viewpoint. Supported by empirical evidence, the research shows how the concept of "optional substitution" was developed as a pragmatic, equitable and broadly acceptable solution to the problem.
0007-1013
587-597
Harwood, Ian
8f945742-3e33-445e-9665-0f613f35fc5b
Harwood, Ian
8f945742-3e33-445e-9665-0f613f35fc5b

Harwood, Ian (2005) When summative computer-aided assessments go wrong: disaster recovery after a major failure. British Journal of Educational Technology, 36 (4), 587-597. (doi:10.1111/j.1467-8535.2005.00484.x).

Record type: Article

Abstract

This case study outlines the events of a recent summative computer-aided assessment (CAA) failure involving 280 first-year undergraduate students. Post-test analysis found that the central server had become unexpectedly overloaded, thereby causing the CAA to be abandoned. Practical advice on just what to do in the event of a summative CAA failure is virtually non-existent in the related literature.
In response, this paper provides a detailed account of the post-failure analysis and recovery activities from a practitioner’s (ie, academic) viewpoint. Supported by empirical evidence, the research shows how the concept of "optional substitution" was developed as a pragmatic, equitable and broadly acceptable solution to the problem.

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Published date: 2005

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 35966
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/35966
ISSN: 0007-1013
PURE UUID: 0dde1bce-d95d-4fcd-98a0-0a961e3d59e5
ORCID for Ian Harwood: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8647-2169

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Date deposited: 22 May 2006
Last modified: 10 Dec 2019 01:48

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