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Hyperbaric biofilms on engineering surfaces formed in the deep sea

Hyperbaric biofilms on engineering surfaces formed in the deep sea
Hyperbaric biofilms on engineering surfaces formed in the deep sea
Biofouling is a major problem for long-term deployment of sensors in the marine environment. This study showed that significant biofilm formation occurred on a variety of artificial materials (glass, copper, Delrin™ and poly-methyl methacrylate [PMMA]) deployed for 10?days at a depth of 4700?m in the Cayman Trough. Biofilm surface coverage was used as an indicator of biomass. The lowest biofilm coverage was on copper and PMMA. Molecular analyses indicated that bacteria dominated the biofilms found on copper, Delrin™ and PMMA with 75, 55 and 73% coverage, respectively. Archea (66%) were dominant on the glass surface simulating interior sensor conditions, whereas Eukarya comprised the highest percentage of microflora (75%) on the glass simulating the exterior of sensors. Analysis of Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis profiles indicated that copper and Delrin™ shared the same community diversity, which was not the case for glass and PMMA, or between PMMA and copper/Delrin™. Sequence alignment matches belonged exclusively to uncultivable microorganisms, most of which were not further classified. One extracted sequence found on glass was associated with Cowellia sp., while another extracted from the PMMA surface was associated with a bacterium in the Alterominidaceae, both ?-proteobacteria. The results demonstrate the necessity of understanding biofilm formation in the deep sea and the potential need for mitigation strategies for any kind of long-term deployment of remote sensors in the marine environment.
biofouling, biofilm formation, deep sea, hyperbaric biofilm
0892-7014
1029-1042
Meier, Alexandra
25e80dc3-c986-46d3-830f-fb7e3cf6d852
Tsaloglou, Nefeli-Maria
99ab30ba-15da-4d25-86ba-608d127f8369
Mowlem, Matthew C.
6f633ca2-298f-48ee-a025-ce52dd62124f
Keevil, C. William
cb7de0a7-ce33-4cfa-af52-07f99e5650eb
Connelly, Douglas P.
d49131bb-af38-4768-9953-7ae0b43e33c8
Meier, Alexandra
25e80dc3-c986-46d3-830f-fb7e3cf6d852
Tsaloglou, Nefeli-Maria
99ab30ba-15da-4d25-86ba-608d127f8369
Mowlem, Matthew C.
6f633ca2-298f-48ee-a025-ce52dd62124f
Keevil, C. William
cb7de0a7-ce33-4cfa-af52-07f99e5650eb
Connelly, Douglas P.
d49131bb-af38-4768-9953-7ae0b43e33c8

Meier, Alexandra, Tsaloglou, Nefeli-Maria, Mowlem, Matthew C., Keevil, C. William and Connelly, Douglas P. (2013) Hyperbaric biofilms on engineering surfaces formed in the deep sea. Biofouling, 29 (9), 1029-1042. (doi:10.1080/08927014.2013.824967).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Biofouling is a major problem for long-term deployment of sensors in the marine environment. This study showed that significant biofilm formation occurred on a variety of artificial materials (glass, copper, Delrin™ and poly-methyl methacrylate [PMMA]) deployed for 10?days at a depth of 4700?m in the Cayman Trough. Biofilm surface coverage was used as an indicator of biomass. The lowest biofilm coverage was on copper and PMMA. Molecular analyses indicated that bacteria dominated the biofilms found on copper, Delrin™ and PMMA with 75, 55 and 73% coverage, respectively. Archea (66%) were dominant on the glass surface simulating interior sensor conditions, whereas Eukarya comprised the highest percentage of microflora (75%) on the glass simulating the exterior of sensors. Analysis of Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis profiles indicated that copper and Delrin™ shared the same community diversity, which was not the case for glass and PMMA, or between PMMA and copper/Delrin™. Sequence alignment matches belonged exclusively to uncultivable microorganisms, most of which were not further classified. One extracted sequence found on glass was associated with Cowellia sp., while another extracted from the PMMA surface was associated with a bacterium in the Alterominidaceae, both ?-proteobacteria. The results demonstrate the necessity of understanding biofilm formation in the deep sea and the potential need for mitigation strategies for any kind of long-term deployment of remote sensors in the marine environment.

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More information

Published date: October 2013
Keywords: biofouling, biofilm formation, deep sea, hyperbaric biofilm
Organisations: Marine Geoscience, Ocean Technology and Engineering

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 359713
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/359713
ISSN: 0892-7014
PURE UUID: 11e21f19-9d3d-4612-97b0-eed9f1eeda7e
ORCID for C. William Keevil: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1917-7706

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 08 Nov 2013 15:41
Last modified: 09 Nov 2021 03:05

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Contributors

Author: Alexandra Meier
Author: Nefeli-Maria Tsaloglou
Author: Matthew C. Mowlem
Author: Douglas P. Connelly

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