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Shoreline response of eroding soft cliffs due to hard defences

Shoreline response of eroding soft cliffs due to hard defences
Shoreline response of eroding soft cliffs due to hard defences
Soft cliff retreat has often triggered a hard adaptation response by the building of seawalls and groynes. On adjacent undefended coasts erosion continues, resulting in set-backs. This paper examines the impact of coastal defences on the adjacent coast from historic records and present practices, and explores possible future response. Continued set-back often leads to outflanking of defences, making them ineffective at their extremities, particularly at the down-drift end where it is most severe. Solutions to outflanking usually involve extending defences, initiating a cycle of set-back, outflanking and further extensions. Multiple defence extensions and continued retreat of the unprotected adjacent coast results in artificial headland formation. Over several decades, headlands experience foreshore steepening and reduced sediment availability, making them more difficult and expensive to defend. Shoreline management plan policies of managed retreat advocate selective defence abandonment, which may change the nature of artificial headland formation. Defence abandonment and new engineering works must be planned, anticipating the processes described in this paper. This will reduce unexpected changes and reduce maintenance and emergency work costs.
1741-7597
3-14
Brown, S.
dd3c5852-78cc-435a-9846-4f3f540f2840
Barton, M.E.
eea85a67-8def-49a1-a48c-f332310388d9
Nicholls, R.J.
4ce1e355-cc5d-4702-8124-820932c57076
Brown, S.
dd3c5852-78cc-435a-9846-4f3f540f2840
Barton, M.E.
eea85a67-8def-49a1-a48c-f332310388d9
Nicholls, R.J.
4ce1e355-cc5d-4702-8124-820932c57076

Brown, S., Barton, M.E. and Nicholls, R.J. (2014) Shoreline response of eroding soft cliffs due to hard defences. Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers - Maritime Engineering, 167 (1), 3-14. (doi:10.1680/maen.11.00026).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Soft cliff retreat has often triggered a hard adaptation response by the building of seawalls and groynes. On adjacent undefended coasts erosion continues, resulting in set-backs. This paper examines the impact of coastal defences on the adjacent coast from historic records and present practices, and explores possible future response. Continued set-back often leads to outflanking of defences, making them ineffective at their extremities, particularly at the down-drift end where it is most severe. Solutions to outflanking usually involve extending defences, initiating a cycle of set-back, outflanking and further extensions. Multiple defence extensions and continued retreat of the unprotected adjacent coast results in artificial headland formation. Over several decades, headlands experience foreshore steepening and reduced sediment availability, making them more difficult and expensive to defend. Shoreline management plan policies of managed retreat advocate selective defence abandonment, which may change the nature of artificial headland formation. Defence abandonment and new engineering works must be planned, anticipating the processes described in this paper. This will reduce unexpected changes and reduce maintenance and emergency work costs.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 12 June 2013
Published date: March 2014
Organisations: Energy & Climate Change Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 359764
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/359764
ISSN: 1741-7597
PURE UUID: a8cdb535-aec9-4c86-b0b2-00c00c26aa32
ORCID for S. Brown: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1185-1962
ORCID for R.J. Nicholls: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-9715-1109

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 12 Nov 2013 11:45
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 03:56

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